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4

Ok here is how it should work. The CSS @font-face { font-family: "BellGothicStd"; src: url("fonts/BellGothicStd-Black.otf") format("opentype"); } h1 { font-family: 'BellGothicStd', Arial, sans-serif; font-weight:normal; font-style:normal; } The HTML <!DOCTYPE html> <html lang="en"> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="...


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I was thinking that if it were just a caching problem, the old version of file should be show in "view source", shouldn't it? View Source will actually show you the new version of the file, not the old version. Chrome and Firefox both refresh the resource when you View Source, which means you would see the new version. To ensure you always get the fresh ...


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Using a span like that does not hurt SEO, however there is no reason to do it when the ::first-letter pseudoelement exists. You can do the following to style just the first letter without messing with your markup: h1 { font-size: (your preferred font size for the rest of the text); } h1::first-letter { font-size: (your larger font size for the first ...


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Yes, this is ok and Search engines would see the text as "Hello". Reason: Drop caps, Websites likes NYC.com uses drop caps, drop caps needs special CSS codes without div, span or class drop caps are not possible but Search engines still crawl them. You just have to make sure Search engines can crawl your site. This won't hurt SEO. There is no ...


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The best way to optimize page performance yet serve high-res images to high-dpi clients is to use the img srcset HTML attribute, like this: <img srcset=" /img/image4x.jpg 4x, /img/image3x.jpg 3x, /img/image2x.jpg 2x, /img/image1x.jpg 1x" src="/img/image1x.jpg" > In this example, the larger multipliers link to images that are 2x, 3x, and 4x ...


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As an extra benefit, it would be ideal if such software would be able to identify any duplicate entries too. cssnano and csso are what you're looking for.


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There is no automatically created About page. A link to it does get created automatically, you can remove that by editing MediaWiki:Sidebar.


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If you are not using Joomla at all, my suggested step is to make a complete backup of the joomla site, then delete it and replace it with your files. If you aren't using Joomla any more then you don't need any of the Joomla core files. Watch out that you don't delete images or other assets that you may have uploaded and need in the new site.


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You create a single file with all the CSS. You create a single file containing the contents of all the JavaScript. You remove the links to all the css and JS from your pages and replace it with: <script src="/js/combined.js"></script> <link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/combined.css"> You should run your combined js and css through a ...


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Typically when replacing a Joomla website, I move all the files and folders in the root folder (e.g. /public_html) into a sub folder such as /public_html/old which I retain for a few weeks in case I need to retrieve anything I have forgotten about or need to compare the new website to the old website. If it exists, you should probably leave the /.well-known ...


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You should show Google what an end-user would see. Check the Google Webmaster Guidelines Basic principles Make pages primarily for users, not for search engines. Don't deceive your users. Avoid tricks intended to improve search engine rankings. A good rule of thumb is whether you'd feel comfortable explaining what you've done to a website ...


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Google reads CSS so in short. Yes. The overall page will be rendered by Google and used to determine if mobile friendly etc. If you aren't serving media queries in your CSS that will be a problem. Theres lots of best practice reading around that. E.g this page exists for a reason. https://search.google.com/test/mobile-friendly It's also likely that ...


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Will Google render that page and treat the h2 as the true h1 for the page? Both, Yes and No. Google fetches the HTML of your page and then analyzes it in different ways. Google examines one or more pages to extract the content of the page separate from the headers, sidebars, footers, etc. Once Google has the content, it breaks it down to a DOM (document ...


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AFAIK, Google relies on H1, H2, etc only, and not on how these styles look like. Your H1 will be the main title for Google, not your H2.


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several folder/files that belong to Joomla Do you mean only core files? Or files, which are important fo ruser, like images or pdf? If you mean only Joomla core or extension files - they may be deleted. But if there are images or documents, which could be important for visitors - try to redirect them, or you will experience a kind of downgrade after switch....


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You have the HTML of your site. Then you create CSS stylesheet files that upon inclusion modify your site's appearance. If you want to remove the style, you just remove the CSS stylesheets and you are left with pure HTML and content. If you want to modify the site's appearance you just include a different set of CSS stylesheets to your HTML. No reason to ...


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Leading whitespace creates a <pre> block in wikitext. Try using the SyntaxHighlight extension instead.


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The standard practice for showing h1 tags on large resolution screens (PC) while hiding h1 tags for mobile devices is to use CSS in a way similar to as follows: <head> <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0"> </head> <style> @media screen and (max-width: 850px) { h1 { font-size: 12px; } @media screen ...


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min-width tends to be favored over min-height in CSS because of the way that web pages scroll. Web pages typically have a single scroll bar that scrolls the page up and down vertically. Having two scrolling directions is usually bad for usability. Having only horizontal scrolling is technically difficult. Text works better with vertical scrolling ...


1

Okay taking a quick look, I can see that letter spacing is definitely different which has a huge impact on the visual appearance of font. On one site it's: letter-spacing: 0.7px; On other site it's: letter-spacing: 1px; Both sites seem to be using V15 of Open Sans as different version numbers change the font appearance as well. Also, to easily check all ...


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I found that if you call up the specific document (localhost/example/cssfile.css) in yuor browser, then "refresh" it, the document changes will update and take effect. Not sure if this is a Window's glitch, or a WAMP glitch. But that has consistantly resolved the problem for me.


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Believe it or not, your everyday text editor is probably all you need. I've been using TextPad for years. It comes with a tool to "Compare Files" which can automate this daunting task for you. TextPad isn't the only one that can do that. Notepad++ has a downloadable plugin which allows you to find the differences between two files. Diffchecker is an online ...


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This is a bit of a guess so don't hold me to it. With tools such as SEMRush (Helps identify weaknesses in your sites SEO); I think this reads the page only up until you would be able to execute jQuery / JS. So whatever is on your page within the DOM on load - is what is read. Having objects 'overflow: hidden;' isn't going to make a difference to your score....


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That has no effect on SEO. That's just the result of using a CSS framework which has preset classes that are well organized and easy to use. Hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of websites use Bootstrap and frameworks like it with no ill effects.


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Image sprites used to be more relevant back when HTTP/1.1 was the standard, and each HTTP request was done using a separate TCP connection. TCP connections have a lot of overhead, relatively speaking, so it was common for browsers to throttle them, making websites with lots of separate resources perform poorly. Nowadays, as long as the server and client ...


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Also, if you are using PHP, you can put this code: "?v=<?php echo time(); ?>" in case of the link tag, at the final of the href param like this example: "<link rel='stylesheet' href='./inc/mystyle.css?v=<?php echo time(); ?>'>" that will result in your code something like this: "<link rel='stylesheet' href='./inc/mystyle.css?v=1553116856>" ...


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In summary: You created a website that requires human interaction and hides from Googlebot, where questions are answered dynamically, but you want Google to give you a good (SEO) rank? The best solution I can offer (without actually seeing the website you are referring to) is to suggest that you create "landing pages" for your website. Each of your primary ...


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CSS documents focus on appearance, layout, style, and the display characteristics of the corresponding HTML elements. HTML documents primarily focus on content: headers, paragraphs, images, etc. SEO ranks are based on the content of your webpages... When you think about it, the search engine spiders are inherently more concerened about your content than the ...


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I have seen several international companies use little flags at the top of the "splash", or front page. US users would click on the US Flag, British users would click on the Union Jack (is that the right name for it?). And the flags would be linked to the respective sites. As a business model, I can only presume that there would be differences between the ...


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In the U.S., yes. The (HTML, CSS, XML, PHP, etc) code that is used to design a website, or any attribute of the same can be copyrighted. The cost varies and the copyright ownership lasts for 70 years past the owners death, but can be transferred to a new owner (similar to selling your car). Here's the thing. Adding a claim of copyright on your website ...


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