21

Copyright applies to content. So copyright would not apply here since the content is uniquely yours (assumption) and that the theme is available for use by many. Trademarks should be registered (generally). Unless you are using a trademark that is not yours, this does not apply. However, too much similarity may still be considered trade infringement ...


14

No, it's not OK, unless you have permission to do so from the content owner and host. It wastes resources and if it's an image meant to be seen on a page, it wastes potential conversions (+ credit) that the other site should be getting. Eventually you may start to see scary things that can terminate your hosting plan, such as naked people in place of the ...


10

They are technically all correct because the proper usage of a copyright notice is to inform its users there is a copyright license or agreement on the website in question, therefor regardless of the usage they are all correct assuming they all mean the same thing... i.e these are all the same: © Business Name Copyright Business name 2015 © Business Name ...


8

I've seen some very embarrassing/hocking examples of hotlinking payback/revenge which caused users to be banned from the forums they had posted a hotlink in. To go more into detail for some who may not realize exactly what was meant from previous answers and for those who'd be dumb enough to hotlink from a place that doesn't want you to hotlink: Say you ...


7

It's very simple how it works: Google sees 2 or more sites with the same content. It's not gonna show you all of them, because it's not really a good resultpage if everything is the same. So it starts to decide which of the sites will be shown. It does this based on a few factors like: - Which site had it first (on same publish date, this is THE FIRST ...


7

Let me give you practical answer. If yours is heavy backlink profile from high worth sites then chances of Panda penalty will be much less than if you hadn't. Secondly if you're copying articles "as is" then it is adding to internet spam. Everyone wastes time and energy on such sites. Google abhors such sites. These ways you can help reduce web spam: So ...


5

It is illegal to copy someone else's written work without their permission. You should also check the terms and conditions of the social network in question as well, because they may also have clauses where they retain some rights of what users post. Furthermore, search engines typically frown upon content that is copied straight from other pages and rank ...


5

Technically, you can get sued (at least in the United States). The logo images are owned by social networks. They have copyright on them. You have to have a licence for to use them at all. (Generally, the sites give a licence to use them for social sharing buttons when unaltered.) They generally have policies against modifying the logo images in any way: ...


5

I was just reading this today: http://www.problogger.net/archives/2012/09/07/how-to-hit-content-scrapers-where-it-hurts/ Don't bother reading it- I will tell you what it says. It is not much of an article, but there were two excellent points that made sense to me. Point 1: File a complaint with Adsense if it applies. https://support.google.com/adsense/bin/...


5

Linking to resources on another site such as images is generally frowned upon unless the site that hosts the images intends for this to happen. The reason for this is simple. It can take a lot of network bandwidth away from the site owner for your gain. You have to be careful that you are not using copyrighted resources without permission. If you have ...


5

No. You cannot. Copyright and trademark law applies no matter what you are using it for or for whom. But just ask for permission. This removes all ambiguity. Promoting their product that you are selling is in their best interests, too, so marketing may help you. That said, some companies still want to protect how their product is presented and may not want ...


4

First needs to come "©". "Copyright" "©" are the same thing so you could choose either. You only need one of them and you shouldn't use both. You could also use "(c)" or "Copr." instead if you wanted to. I always use the symbol myself. The first year of publication needs to come second. The name of the copyright holder comes third. "All rights ...


4

Each country has it's own laws, however, in the U.S., the law is quite clear. 17 U.S.C. § 107 Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 and 17 U.S.C. § 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as ...


4

Just adding to closetnoc's answer. Wordpress is released with GPLv2 (or later) from the free software foundation. Part of this license outlines requirements for derivative works, such as plugins or themes. Derivatives of WordPress code inherit the GPL license. Which means that it's free full stop! (Developers only charge you for access, automatic update ...


4

If you haven't already, you probably want to verify your site on both Google Search Console and Bing Webmaster Tools. Adding the verification will help the search engines recognize the legitimate site. You may also want to consider adding metatags declaring the author and generator in your site's templates. See metatag properties/values on MDN here. Add ...


4

According to copyright.gov: Copyright protects original works of authorship [...] Ideas and discoveries are not protected by the copyright law, although the way in which they are expressed may be. So that means that information (ideas) themselves aren't covered under copyright law, just the way that information is expressed (including but not limited to ...


3

Set a preferred URL for your content using canonical URL A canonical link element is an HTML element that helps webmasters prevent duplicate content issues by specifying the "canonical", or "preferred", version of a web page as part of search engine optimization. What is rel=canonical and Why Should I Use It: When you run a data driven site or have other ...


3

I reworded your post and added a link, so that other readers and future visitors will know what the DMCA is. After that I did a little Research regarding the format, and found a link on How to Send a DMCA Takedown Notice from a Lawyer's Blog. I hope this helps. I'm sorry that this happened to you.


3

Even Though both the articles looks different ( original and duplicate ) Google can easily separate those articles. Google won't rank your page unless it is original and user lovable. Matt Cutts stated that "Duplicate Content Won’t Hurt You, Unless It Is Spammy" If those contents are spammy then Google will penalize you. Majority of the spinning tools are ...


3

If there isn't a TOS policy preventing the user's copyright, the creator of the key would have the right to claim a copyright for any information that is not considered just a fact. If they wrote a bio, then they have the right to claim a copyright for that. However, info such as their name cannot be copyrighted because it would be considered a fact. See ...


3

There is a Google Webmaster post from 2009 saying that you should wrap image and license like that: <div about="image.jpg"> <img src="image.jpg"> <a rel="license" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/">Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0</a> </div> However, I have checked another of their blog ...


3

Unless a lawyer comes along that knows about the appropriate law in your jurisdiction then all you're going to get is people's opinion. Take a look around on the web, literally countless websites use their own themed social media icons as you say. Unless you're trying to imply some sort of affiliation or endorsement then I don't see what a social media ...


3

Send a mail to the host and tell them that they are copying your content and you will take legal action against them. Most of them will immediately take action as for hosts, there is nothing to gain and everything to lose. You can also contact the registrar but the bigger the company, the less they will care about this as they don't make money through this....


3

Short answer: Yes Long answer: Copyrights protect works, and trademarks protect marks (i.e., a recognizable sign, design or expression which identifies products or services), so trademarks are what you should be concerned with when registering domains. Since they're so widely used, the names of programming languages are typically in the public domain, ...


3

The DMCA is U.S. law, however, many organizations and search engines participate in a sort of co-operative organization to satisfy these requests. If you file the DMCA complaint through Google, they inform Chilling Effects which is the de-facto organization which in turn will act as the information clearing house for anyone else who participates in removing ...


3

Watermarks are excellent. Some image editors allow you to embed copyright data into the image that is extremely difficult to remove since it is interspersed within the image data. You can optionally register this trademark data with a registry though it is not necessary. I have used http://www.smalleranimals.com/thumb.htm to do this for me in the past. It ...


3

Copyright protection law can be interpreted differently by legal systems in different countries. In the U.S., as indicated by the United States Copyright Office here, copyright protection begins: The moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. Copyrights are only ...


3

Yes. You have a problem. Explorebuncombe.com: Is an events site and does not appear to have a copy of your site but may have in the past- who knows. It is not related to the next two sites. Exploredare.com: Is a copy of your site without a frame or 301 redirect. The IP address is 50.56.48.239 which is on a Rackspace IP address block. Exploregastonia.com: ...


3

I want to create a website that will grab content from other news websites using their RSS and insert it in my database. I am only going to show the title and an excerpt with a link to the original post. Is this a good idea? No, because you're using someone else's content Will Google ban my website? If you keep it up, then Google will eventually notice, ...


3

It may interest you that the highest court in the European Union has ruled that hotlinking content is always legal, except if the content isn't publicly accessible at the site where it its hosted. (For example, if the content is behind a paywall.) This doesn't mean that embedding third-party comes without risks, though. As @dhaupin mentions, a site can ...


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