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It's fine, there's no need to hide it. Google knows these things need to exist, and having one will not hurt your SEO. Indeed, many large sites, e.g., Android and Google themselves, don't hide their consent pop-ups. John Mueller from Google has spoken about this (as well as related concerns around penalties for intrusive popups and interstitials) at some ...


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CNAME cloaking allows the tracker to bypass outright blocking of the tracking script. It does not allow cookies to be set across multiple domains. To link cookies w1_id and w2_id set on different sites, browser fingerprinting would usually be used. 99.5% of users can be uniquely identified based on unique characteristics of the user's settings, browser, ...


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https://gdpr.eu/cookies/ has a good summary of cookie usage under the GDPR in very readable language. It says: Strictly necessary cookies — These cookies are essential for you to browse the website and use its features, such as accessing secure areas of the site. Cookies that allow web shops to hold your items in your cart while you are shopping online ...


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There is no way to make a cookie splash page work with SEO. Googlebot and other crawlers never send cookies. If you redirect any time there are no cookies, it makes your entire site uncrawlable. If you decided to allow bots user agents to bypass this check then you would be cloaking and your site is likely to get penalized by Google and not show up in ...


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Google's documentation cites these examples for what they generally consider as fourth-party: The vendors permitted to make fourth-party calls are generally of the following type: Research products, which include Analytics/Performance, Brand-Lift Studies, & Verification Services. By opposition to third-party: The vendors permitted to make third-party ...


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