19

It is referring to Response Headers and not document body ("Content-Type tag"). If you check Response Headers of your page with any HTTP Debugger (for example, Net panel of Firebug for Firefox, or similar tab of Developer Tools in Google Chrome/Internet Explorer/Safari/Opera), you will see this line: Content-Type: text/html At the same time, if you check ...


9

Use UTF-8, with proper fonts installed on the client, it universally represents all character sets of all the languages on the planet. Chinese, Cyrillic, Kanji, Arabic, Latin variants, etc. Find the Character Map tool in Windows 7 or its analog in Ubuntu 10+ and have a look at all of them in the various fonts. You can find different fonts are localized to ...


6

"Is there a common way to override the server headers send to the browser from within the HTML document?" AFAIK no, you do what you can do already. The defined charset via Header trumps your definition in the META tag. If you have access to the server, e.g. Apache, it is configured by this statement (see the comment lines): # Read the documentation before ...


6

You are probably seeing a difference in line-endings. When transferring a file in ASCII/Text mode (as opposed to "Binary mode") then most FTP clients will convert/normalise line-endings to the OS being transferred to. On Classic Mac OS (9.x and earlier) the line-ending char is simply \r (ASCII 13), on Mac OS X this changed to \n (ASCII 10), on Linux it is \...


5

What @Fiasco_Labs said as far as which to use. For statistics: UTF-8 Growth on the Web at the W3C blog UTF-8 Usage Trends from BuiltWith


5

The real filename would be exactly the same filename you originally named it. Your only limitation is that set out by the operating system and the filesystem. OK, so looking at Comparison of file systems if you only care about the main players file systems: Windowz (FAT32, NTFS): Any Unicode except NUL and / Mac(HFS, HFS+): Any valid ...


4

Alright, after some digging, here is what I have found (and it works). IndexOptions Charset=UTF-8 Cheers!


3

No. Such encoding is standard web development and plays no part in SEO. If anything, I would think it would help since it properly defines such letters—in which case I guess it might play a part in SEO—just to contradict myself.


3

UTF-8 can represent all languages supported by Unicode, all million+ characters. It uses one byte for ASCII characters (0-127), but up to 4 bytes for some international characters. UTF-16 also can also represent all Unicode characters. It uses exactly 2 bytes per character. I would recommend using UTF-8 exclusively. It has several advantages over ...


3

No, it's not possible from within the HTML. The servers response header take precedence over the document's meta-tag. As it's specified in 5.2.2 Specifying the character encoding - HTML 4.01 Specification : To sum up, conforming user agents must observe the following priorities when determining a document's character encoding (from highest priority to ...


3

You should set something like this in your root .htaccess <FilesMatch "\.(htm|html|xhtml|xml|php)$"> AddDefaultCharset utf-8 </FilesMatch>


3

Changing the collation is what you want to do. Collations are rules regarding the sort order and search sensitivity. Every collation is based on a certain character set. There is no way to specify the character set separately from the collation.


3

Yes. Don't transfer UTF-16 files in ASCII mode; use binary mode to avoid data corruption here. FTP's transformation of \r\n to \n will corrupt the remainder of the file if it happens to contain the single character ഊ or the sequence ㄍਰ or many others of the same class. Please note that this is not an intelligent transformation, and the reverse ...


2

Sorry, Metalshark, I couldn't provide a link. Thanks for trying to help though. A colleague found this question when he was searching for a solution as well. The solution in our case was fairly specific to a product we are using, but I will give the gist of it in case it helps anyone else looking in the future. The problem came down to MIME types and how we ...


2

Assuming you're dealing with the US, addresses are fairly public. The only real privacy concern is matching addresses to individuals -- and I don't think that an email address alone (at least, from what you've shared with us of your schema) is enough to present that risk. I work for SmartyStreets where we handle a lot of address data (standardizing, ...


2

As Osvaldo comments, it would be helpful to know just why you think you need to know this. When a user visits a web page, the browser will parse the page using whatever encoding the server tells it to use (via the HTTP Content-Type header or the corresponding HTML <meta> tag). The only time the browser default encoding matters is when the server ...


2

The best place for the character set declaration when served from your webserver is in the "Content-Type" header. You are doing it correctly when serving it from PHP. You could also set the header for CSS and JS. Assuming that your CSS and JS are not served through PHP, but as static files, you could add the following to your .htaccess file: ...


2

The answer I've accepted on this is correct however I'm adding some notes about how I used this information to work out what was going on. The question uses file1.html and file2.html for simplicity. In reality file1.html represents a "master" copy of a web page downloaded in the past. file2.html is the most recent download of the web page content. The ...


2

Yes , ftp does some encoding changes. Data is transferred from a storage device in the sending Host to a storage device in the receiving Host. Often it is necessary to perform certain transformations on the data because data storage representations in the two systems are different. For example, NVT-ASCII has different data storage representations in ...


2

Search engines know how to decode and index text with HTML entities. &#246; and ö both get indexed properly as the letter ö. The only drawback to using HTML entities for such characters is the size of your source code. If you use a lot of such characters, it can significantly increase the byte count of your pages. Only a few characters need to be ...


1

I don't think any browsers support LZF transfer compression at this point. I say this because searching for "lzf firefox", "lzf safari", "lzf internet explorer" and "lzf chrome" don't yield any documents about their implementations of it. The only relevant result appears to be a JavaScript library that implements LZF: https://github.com/pkalogiros/LZFjs ...


1

FileZilla has a Wiki page about this issue with character sets To paraphrase, it says that: FTP originally allowed only ASCII characters Some servers and clients violated the spec and implemented international characters with a locally chosen character set The FTP protocol was changed to allow UTF-8 instead of just ASCII FileZilla uses the UTF-8 character ...


1

We tried lots of things but finally got something to work. We have to send a header before sending any other output. Thus the cause proposed by Simon Hayter is correct, and our solution implements the correction. Here is what the first two lines or our code looks like: <?php header('Content-Type:text/html;charset=gb18030'); We believe the root cause is ...


1

The HTTP header you need to add is Content-Type: text/html; charset: ISO-8859-1. You can add FilesMatch and other directives within the Apache <VirtualHost> declaration: <VirtualHost> # other directives here such as DocumentRoot <FilesMatch "\.(htm|html|php)$"> AddDefaultCharset ISO-8859-1 Header always set Content-Type "text/...


1

Will the browser cache these images? Well, what do you mean by caching in this context? Browsers cache static files so they don't have to request them again. If the image data is provided inline in the HTML page itself, no caching is required. If the image data is supplied in the stylesheet, then since the stylesheet itself will be cached, the image data ...


1

From: http://allseeing-i.com/How-to-setup-your-PHP-site-to-use-UTF8 Unicode is not quite a first class citizen in PHP, so you'll have to do some tweaking to get it to grok UTF-8. Firstly, you need to ensure that you have MBString enabled in your copy of PHP. If you're on Linux and using a packaged PHP, it may be installed by default. If not, it's ...


1

UTF-8 is a transfer encoding that can represent all the 1,114,112 code points in Unicode (that is, all Unicode characters and also code points not assigned to characters). You may have been misled by the information that in UTF-8, a single code unit is 8 bits and has thus 256 possible values. But the representation of a character uses a variable number (one ...


1

In addition to what was said here, I'd try use the same charset in all pages - preferably UTF-8 (but if nearly everything is iso-8859-1, use this). To quicky check the charset of a file, you can try: file --mime-type --mime-encoding {filename} To check the charset of all files in the tree, you can try: find . -type f -exec file --mime-type --mime-...


1

The charset specified by web server in the HTTP header has priority. There are a few solutions to your problems: Tell web server to output different header for files in some directories (use AddCharset of AddDefaultCharset directives in the context) Convert all into UTF-8 and use only this charset Convert your UTF-8 encoded pages into iso-8859-1 using ...


1

As I understand it, the character encoding used by the browser is decided in the following order: The Content-Type response header as sent from the server. If not #1 then the Content-Type META tag. If neither of the above then the browser default, which I assume is based initially on the default language on the system. AFAIK the default encoding in the ...


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