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Updated answer for 2017: Yes. The size column in the Network tab in Chrome Developer Tools has both the compressed and uncompressed size, for gzip, brotli and whatever comes in future. Eg: Here the compressed size is 242 KB, the uncompressed size is 1.1 MB To see both, ensure you have Devtools showing large request rows. You can find the checkbox by the ...


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Google makes reference to gzip and image/binary files at Minimize payload size Don't use gzip for image or other binary files. Image file formats supported by the web, as well as videos, PDFs and other binary formats, are already compressed; using gzip on them won't provide any additional benefit, and can actually make them larger. To compress images, see ...


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Update for 2017 When using large icons, the chrome dev tools show a before and after compression size in the network tabs. I confirmed by switching gzip off and on on my webserver.


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Compress resources with GZIP This is another one of those things where new technology is being shoved into our faces and some companies and/or tools aren't setup to handle it (such as the Google page speed insights). After looking at the new compression info, it seems only newer web browsers support it. A large number of tools and web servers still ...


5

GitLab Pages will serve pre-compressed .gz files that exist alongside uncompressed equivalents. A general solution that should work with most static publishing systems is to put this as the last step in the build process in .gitlab-ci.yml: find public \( -name '*.html' -o -name '*.css' -o -name '*.js' \) -print0 | xargs -0 gzip -9 -kv You can also easily ...


4

Does CloudFlare gzip resources? Yes, CloudFlare gzips resources that pass through our network. We also gzip items based on the browser's useragent to help speed up page loading time. If you're already using gzip we will honor your gzip settings as long as you're passing the details in a header from your web server for the files. Source: https://support....


4

To answer your specific question, the smallest size an HTML document (or any page asset like CSS or JavaScript) can be before compression becomes overkill will be what you can fit inside a single TCP packet. This is the Maximum Transmission Unit or 'MTU', and a safe assumption about size is 1400 bytes. Compressing assets smaller than 1400 bytes is pointless. ...


4

Enabling compression is almost universally a good idea. You might not save much data on very small pages, but you also won't waste very much CPU compressing them. An even better idea, if you're trying to ensure your site is fast and reliable, is to put a caching service like CloudFlare between your users and your server. Having a good intermediary will ...


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Put these lines in your .htaccess and PageSpeed Insights will see your gzip compression: <IfModule mod_deflate.c> <FilesMatch "\.(html|php|txt|xml|js|css)$"> SetOutputFilter DEFLATE </FilesMatch> </IfModule> It works for my sites.


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That's exactly it - the file gets smaller because the colors are combined into fewer, more prominent colors. For example, multiple shades of blue living next to each other will combine to display as fewer, more uniform shades, in the process making the image file less heavy. Each time you run your software, it'll find places to optimize this process, though ...


4

It isn't a virus or some sort of FTP compression. It could be a couple of things going on: For example, if the server is running Linux and your desktop is running Windows it is likely that your server and desktop are set to display file sizes differently. In some operating systems, file sizes tend to be expressed mebibytes (e.g. 1 GiB = 1,024 MiB) while ...


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Lossless VS Normal Compression Looks like you're getting your wires mixed, Google insights refers to lossless compression, not the JPEG encoder. jpegoptim, jpegtran, jpegrescan, mozjpeg1, mozjpeg2 and so on are all lossless compression tools, not JPEG encoders such as Guetzli. What this means is it takes an already compressed file and makes it even smaller ...


3

Data compressed with gzip contain all the information needed to decompress the data. This means an attacker can simply decompress the data, same as the browser. So this is no more secure than plain text. And the compression level in gzip is actually irrelevant for decompression since it only says how much efforts will be done in finding common pattern in the ...


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It's a good question and there is no one size fits all answer. However with the rise of mobile networks the answer is almost always compress as much as possible. In the long run uncompressing on the client will always use less energy than using more bandwith. Gzip is very lightweight but it can become an overkill when: the compression level is set to too ...


3

Apache Tomcat has gzip filter and it starts to zip from 2kb, my quick test tells that it's the lowest boundary, and you can increase it at least to 3-4kb. Because for 2kb you will get a similar size at the output + time penalty for zipping.


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Interesting case, since the page is fairly simple. Firstly, I'd agree with closetnoc's comment that your page is already pretty fast - it's clear you've spent some time working on speed, so any further gains will be micro-optimizations at best. (Faster DNS would certainly help though, as you said.) My pages are served gzipped and I flush the buffers ...


3

Your files will be smaller if you minify them before using gzip. Gzip isn't perfect compression. It doesn't remove remove all the redundancy that minifying does. Gzip is lossless compression. At the very least that means it has to preserve information such as the number of indentations on each line. It may only take a byte or two for preserving that ...


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The file is suffering from something called Metadata Bloat. Basically, there's a TON of data in the "history section" of the file itself. This usually happens either because (1) the Photoshop they used to save it was malfunctioning somehow, or (2) they were playing around with the code of the file itself and dumped a bunch of trash in it. Here are ...


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No.... image sprites are not good for photos and complex pictures. This is because the file size would simply become far to big and would delay the page from loading and increasing the time it takes for users to see any content. Sprites are good for basic template styling images that get reused across the site, this for many reasons is because it becomes ...


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For anyone still arriving here from a general google search (like I did), in modern versions of Firefox it's possible to see the "raw" and gzipped size directly from its devtools by comparing the "Transferred Size" column and "Size" column. "Size" is the raw size of the response, the "Transferred size" is the actual size of the data transferred for the ...


2

All Gzip decompression programs can decompress any of the levels. The compression level doesn't change the format of the output at all. The compression level is good for managing load on your server. Gzip will spend many more CPU cycles trying to compress the data better when you specify a higher compression level. In my experience the benefits of ...


2

This is an issue with the test, not with anything you are supposedly doing wrong. From your screen-shot I can see that the potential size savings is only 526 bytes which is well within the size of a single network packet (an MTU, about 1500 bytes) which makes it unlikely that compression of that last wee bit of data will help. At best, you would eliminate a ...


2

To directly answer your question I would differ you to the Better Minify Plugin: https://wordpress.org/plugins/bwp-minify/ It will easily let you compress your .js files. And it will allow you to move your .js scripts to the footer to enhance your above-the-fold loading. HOWEVER I want to point out that moving all of your .js scripts to the footer isn't ...


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What does the "Disable Cache" have to do with gzip and compression? Nothing directly. Except that when "Disable Cache" is checked (ie. the local browser cache is disabled) the server is forced to send a fresh response (and body). You'd get the same response if you simply cleared your browser cache before making the request (with "Disable Cache" unchecked). ...


2

For the most part I think that compressing the images with higher JPG compression should suffice. I say this because we do know that Google cares a lot about speed - and the reason they are advising you of the sizes of your images is because they transfer unnecessary data and slow down your connection. I don't have an authoritative source, but according to ...


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You have no control on expires, compression or any other header property on external resources. Rather than trying to satisfy pointless speed score websites you should focus on how quickly your pages load. Google, Bing and your users DO NOT CARE what your code looks like or how your website loads the code, what they care about is the end result. If your ...


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You can use plugin https://wordpress.org/plugins/bwp-minify/ And here is full detailed instruction given here http://www.wpbeginner.com/plugins/how-to-minify-css-javascript-files-in-wordpress/ Along with it I suggest gzip your website. A complete guide to it is given here : https://www.bmthrive.com/how-to-gzip-website/ If your website uses images then ...


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It's not the specific compressor you need to know here. It's actually the amount of compression that is key. Uploading images without compression will provide original quality images at a price of a larger download. If you compress them just enough, then you'll get excellent quality images since people don't scan most images they see on the internet one ...


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I use Gimp software plus a plugin that allows batch optimizing. The percentage of compression is the tricky part especially for batches. I would test at least one image before doing batches.


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I simply compressed them using gzip: gzip sitemap1.xml My server nginx is enabled to send compressed files. It looks like you're trying to send a double-compressed file and a compressed file. When you gzip a file and host it on a server that is set up to compress and send files, then you basically compressed the same file twice and when one level of ...


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