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17

For what it's worth, I'll offer my own take on this. Hidden text alone is not deceptive. What you do with it is what determines whether it's deceptive. There are many scenarios in which hidden text is a good thing, both in terms of accessibility, functionality and just pure awesomeness. But there are also some setbacks, and times where hidden text may ...


11

I agree with w3d’s answer, there should be no problem with Google Search or any other search engine. However, I suggest to make it visible anyway. Not for SEO, but for accessibility: Screen reader users are not the only users that can benefit from skiplinks. Skiplinks are useful for all users that navigate with the keyboard, and only a subset of those ...


8

I can't see any reason why Google would think a hidden "Skip to content" link was deceptive. Are you flooding the page with hidden keywords or trying to deceive the search engines? No. Google is no doubt very aware of "skip to content"-like links. They have been recommended by the W3C after all. Google does state (in the article you link to) that "not all ...


6

When the red, green, and blue values are "added" together, it really means "concatenated". Your #800080 color code can be split up like this: Red: 80 out of FF or 50% Green: 0 out of FF or 0% Blue: 80 out of FF or 50% It is the only 6 digit hexadecimal color code that will give that exact shade of purple. Other shades of purple can be produced when there ...


5

See the following image: from ColorHexa The way this works: Each of the three colors has 16 shades from 00 to FF(Hex) which translates to 0 to 255(Decimal). You'll also notice that 255 is the equivalent of all ones in a Byte. Stay with me here: While remembering you have a Full byte for R, a Full Byte for G, and a full Byte for B, now you must add the ...


4

What the tool seems to intend is to make sure that the contrast is high enough, but it’s beyond me why it assumes (for some elements) white as default for the foreground and the background. The contrast check should only be done for elements for which the author specifies colors, and assume some sensible default colors (e.g., those used by browsers and other ...


4

Other answers say that Google would allow this, but they don't say what hidden text Google penalizes for. Google only considers hidden text deceptive when: There are hidden keywords that users might search for but then be upset when they find that your site doesn't have them. Users are not likely to be searching for "skip to content" The hidden text ...


1

GIF images by nature cannot display all the colors. They have a color table with 256 entries. If you have more than 256 colors in your source, the color table fills up. The software used to create the GIF has to use heuristics to create a good color table for your image. In your case it appears that the gray for the background of the popup menu is not ...


1

Observations: achecker.ca lists it as "potential problem" (instead of "known" or "likely"). They document this script check in http://achecker.ca/checker/suggestion.php?id=86. They seem to justify the problem with guideline 1.4.1 Use of Color from WCAG 2.0. Let’s see: You could only have a color-related accessibility problem with a script element if you ...


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