8

Some SEOs are wary of using these non-Latin characters in URLs because of the way it might display in certain browsers, or in certain text cases when the link is copied and pasted somewhere online. While having spammy-looking links is never a good thing, I personally think the possible benefit in search results is worth the drawback. For example,...


7

Google is getting confused because while the page is ISO-8859-1, some content is loaded into the page in UTF-8. This causes Googlebot to have to re-encode the content page content as UTF-8 so that it can process it. Something is going wrong during that process and characters are getting mangled. For example, you use a JavaScript library for consenting to ...


4

There are more ways to mess up characters and character sets than can be enumerated in an answer. The important thing is that the character set you declare matches the character set that was used when creating, storing, and reading the data. There are many character sets that can display international characters. UTF-8 is universal and very popular, but it ...


3

HTML attributes are case insensitive so, yes, you can do that. Running it through the validator would have shown you that, too. Note: the <meta> tag does not use and does not need a closing slash and never has.


3

never mind:) do it on the way, your users like better. Google is able to understand both of Latin and Unicode urls. In countries like Russia there are since many years three url types - latin, cyrillic (unicode) and transliterated. And Google understands and ranks all of them. Do some measurements and research on your users: from where they are coming, is ...


2

Are both sets of text content (in an HTML document) equally visible to search engines Absolutely yes: both variants are fully equal. All search engines understand unicode (your second example), the encoded HTML entities from the first example are not a problem too. The entity encoding is nothing other as another encoding like, win-8859-1, utf-8 or win-1251....


2

I'd probably use your keywords report from Search Console. In case visitors are searching in Greek and there is a high chance to have those keywords in your URL then I'd go with λαδοκολλα-περι-ανεμων Otherwise I'd use converted. But all in all it might be not a big deal anyway. E.g. in Russian market both search engines are pretty good in converting ...


2

So far i see, french diacritical signs are not a part of ISO-8859-1 (beside of apostrophe). The cache version of Google doesn't contain these characters. I see two workarounds: Encode the whole content as UTF-8 (would be the way i prefer) Encode diacritical signs as HTML entities. Example: séries becomes s&eacute;ries. This can be done in an editor like ...


2

Thus, instead of displaying >, the article displays >. This occurs (for me, at least) on Chrome, Firefox, and Safari (all latest versions with cache cleared). That is probably a software error where > was turned into &gt; then that was turned into &amp;gt; by some kind of duplicate encoding. You can use "Control-U" to view the ...


2

Tumblr does use UTF-8. Here is a Chinese blog on Tumblr. They need UTF-8 to display the Chinese characters. I've use page info to verify that the character set of the blog's home page is indeed UTF-8.


1

There are five characters that should be escaped as entities in HTML documents, no matter which character set your website uses: < as &lt; > as &gt; & as &amp; " as &quot; ' as &#39; Other special characters always can be escaped with entities, but only need to be if you are using a character set that doesn't contain them....


1

I installed Tomcat 8.5 and it solved the problem.


1

The site I manage contains over 24 languages and many of them have non-latin characters. We decided to use the native characters for the page slugs and it seems to work for our SEO pretty well - also the search term in google is highlighted if it is contained within the slug.


1

A better solution is to never use accented or special characters in URL's as they can case problems with linking. Best practice is to convert accented characters to the non accented version.


1

Are you sure that <a href='&auml;.html'>&amp;auml;.html</a> doesn't work? It should link to the right document (although the link text will be wrong, as you also encoded the &; the correct way to do this would be <a href='&auml;.html'>&auml;.html</a>). However, if you just want to use umlaute directly, you can do ...


1

(I would have written this as a comment but I still don't have the ability to) After trying it out on various edit modes, the output is always the same m&eacute;lt&aacute;n in the source code though it renders as proper letters in the browser. Search engines treat é, ė, ę as e, same for á, ą as a and etc. So probably they're smart enough to change ...


1

Unfortunately, getting character encodings right means checking multiple places. Data can be corrupted in half a dozen places. You need to go through and check each of them. How did you import the data from your Windows machine? Did you use mysqldump? Did you copy the database tables? If you used mysqldump you need to use the --default-character-...


1

The meta tags in your HTML document are important, especially the charset=utf-8 part. However, they are not sufficient to ensure that the document gets displayed correctly. What matters is that the content type matches the character set that was used by the software that created the page. That means that there isn't a single fix for every page on your site....


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