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13

Just count the dots... .co.uk is a top level domain aka first level domain; uk is a TLD. co is a SLD. (Reference: http://www.nominet.uk/uk-domain-names/about-domain-names/uk-domain-family) Although it's common to see .co.uk described as a ccTLD, it's really only the uk part that is the TLD. google.co.uk is a second level domain and an apex domain; ...


10

It is possible for a company with a trademark dispute to take you to court over this, however I would not worry too much about it. They have to make a substantial claim that you have somehow violated their trademark with your given name ("trademarked" whenever you were issued an birth certificate, I would imagine). It's not like you were named "Google" or "...


5

No, it is not possible to register .er right now (Dec. 2016). One way to check how difficult is to register within a domain extension is to perform a search in google like "site:.er". For .er, you can see that google has detected only 10 domain names, and most of the are from the government.


4

You seem to confuse the technical definition with registration policies. .co.uk is not a TLD. .uk is a TLD. As w3d notes, "just count the dots". But .co.uk is "special" in the way that you may register your domain name under this second-level domain. It’s an effective top-level domain (eTLD). Mozilla hosts a list of these eTLDs, which they call Public ...


4

Google will only ever rank .il domains well in Isreal. Google assumes that all content on .il domains is not very relevant outside Isreal. Google maintains a list of top level domains that are geo-targetable. There are a few country code TLDs on that list: .ad .as .bz .cc .cd .co .dj .fm .io .la .me .ms .nu .sc .sr .su .tv .tk .ws However, if your ...


4

Stephen Ostermiller is correct...at the moment. However AuDa, the .au registrar has approved registration directly in the .au TLD See this https://www.auda.org.au/news/auda-to-introduce-direct-registrations-in-au/


4

Your question is relevant but has mostly not definitive long-standing answer in either way. Nothing is eternal: registries can change and eligibility rules can change. Policies on dispute and trademark infringements can change too. First you need to divide the world among gTLDs vs ccTLDs and making sure to take into account edge cases, like .tv or .co which ...


4

Each CCTLD is operated by a regional registry bound by local law, so this is really a question of whether a CCTLD registry is trustworthy and resides in a country with sane laws. So the answer will vary per country. For example the .com TLD is run by Verisign, which is a company based in the US and bound by US law. Likewise the .us CCTLD is run by NeuStar, ...


3

You cannot register second-level .au domains. Only third-level domains may be registered in a small set of second-level categories such as .com.au .net.au .org.au .id.au .asn.au According to Wikipedia: Some second-level domain names are no longer actively used. Whilst registrations are grand-fathered for some, no new registrations are accepted. ...


3

According to https://publicsuffix.org/list/public_suffix_list.dat .name has second level domains that are considered top level domains, but there's no list of them. You'll have to research each name individually to determine if it's a valid, owned domain name, or a top level domain name with owned domains below it. See Get the subdomain from a URL for more ...


3

Things are changing. There's quite a few ccTLD that Google is now treating as gTLDs. And this list will keep growing IMO. You can also set country-target on Google WebMaster Tools (gTLD only feature... hopefully will get improved). Also make sure your page clearly states the language (html lang=). Google will not treat Asian languages (Japanese) as Belgian ...


2

Yes. You have a problem. gTLDs and ccTLDs are treated differently in where they are placed. gTLDs enjoy great penetration throughout all of Google's data centers while ccTLDs do not. The reason is simple and two fold: one, language- Is the language understood within the region?; and two, search history- Has anyone searched and a result given been successful ...


2

It entirely depends on your country. If it officially has two-level TLDs, like for example the UK and Australia, then a second-level TLD is absolutely fine -- no one thinks less of a .co.uk website. If it doesn't, and some third-party has registered com.<country code> and is selling subdomains then you shouldn't touch it with a bargepole, as there are ...


2

We haven't heard anything specific about how the launch of direct registrations on .AU will go (sounds like they're still working on it), but recently .UK did the same thing. Direct registrations on .UK launched in June of 2014, but registrations of exact match domain names are restricted to those who own .CO.UK for the first 5 years. Basically, what this ...


2

You can not renew this domain name so soon. See https://www.nic.ru/dns/service/prolong/en/detailed_description.html#ru (this applies to SU too, see header in webpage) : The Customer can also renew the service before the indicated term (but not earlier than 2 months before the service expiration date).


2

If your organization is really formally structured it is registered somewhere. When you registered it, you also had to put a postal address for it, no? If so, use that one. The address requirement is the idea (quite from the old day, but nevertheless) that if there is a problem with your domain, specifically a legal one, then the organization could receive ...


2

Once you register your name it's yours for as long as you keep the payments up to date. If you decide to register something that is trademarked by a big company, like campbellsoup.com, you should expect to have it challenged. Otherwise, common names and individual words (which cannnot be copyrighted) are available for everyone to use. If you inadvertantly ...


2

If your name is actually Eugene, and especially if it is clear you are using the domain for a legitimate purpose (i.e. it has a website with your name on it), then any registry would be very hard pressed to take it away from you. Taking domains away from registrants is usually reserved for when there is both a trademark issue plus no current legitimate use ...


1

.PM is the ccTLD for "Saint-Pierre and Miquelon", a French overseas territory, and is currently being run by AFNIC as registry: https://www.iana.org/domains/root/db/pm.html https://www.afnic.fr/en/products-and-services/other-french-tlds-top-level-domains/ The latest document on eligibility rules is at https://www.afnic.fr/medias/documents/Cadre_legal/...


1

.com domains seem to succeed on an international level. If you use your nation's tld you're likely to generate more traffic from that country especially if you target it in webmaster console. .design and .cc domains tend not to rank as high in Google search as a .com would, though the .design and .cc domains allow you to have a keyword rich domain which ...


1

The UK registry is very strict about this and they do check the address you provide to them (and as I remember, PO Boxes and the such aren't allowed) so if you need the domain, you'll need to use one of the members addresses.


1

.WS is a very specific case, with very few others not following IDNA2008 (while some others may still be on IDNA2003 or not accepting IDNs at all). (Wikipedia says there are 8 TLDs in that case, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emoji_domain while https://xn--i-7iq.ws/#tlds claims that only .WS accepts them but speaks also about .LA in their history. YMMV) ...


1

Can I geo target a .gg domain to somewhere other than Guernsey No. Currently, .gg domains are not on Google's list of ccTLDs treated as gTLDs; as a result, their intrinsic geographic target can't be overridden. Google suggests setting your site to "Unlisted" for international traffic […]. Is this option currently present for the .gg domain in the Google ...


1

At the end of the day it comes down mostly to preference and what will work best for you and be the most intuitive for your customers. Your strategy for procuring domain names seems well thought out although if available the .com gTLD would be preferable. However rather than redirecting these to subdomains of your main website I would recommend hosting ...


1

Both will target the same country automatically, it means you can't change the location in your search console, once you choose .pk or .co.pk, Google will consider you're targeting only pakistani visitors. So it is your choice to pick only one. There is no any SEO benefits or disadvantages. I will suggest first understand your audience, and then choose ...


1

Besides your "general" ranking can decrease, you will gain more targeted users, i.e. reputation for that specific country. Country-code top-level domain names are one of the elements that Google uses to determine a website’s targeted country. If Google is aware of the country targeted by the site, they will use that information to improve the quality of ...


1

As of today it is not possible to register .au second level domains, only third-level domains (.com.au, .NET.au, .org.au, etc). Also I would like to mention that only Australian business or residents can register .au domain names.


1

While modern browsers do support international characters in domain names, there may be many other tools that don't support them. International characters in domain names are handled by having an ASCII representation of the domain name available for legacy programs. The ASCII version is in PunyCode. Your Chinese domain name http://会学网.中国/ con be viewed as ...


1

Websites are one of those funny things in the international environment. Many countries have written into their laws that sites which specifically target their country must comply with domestic laws regardless of ccTLD. In addition to that, the registry for the ccTLD may have in its Terms of Service (TOS) which country has jurisdiction over domains ...


1

No benefit I can see. All you'd do is begin to build some value on the ccTLDs and then diminish it by redirecting the directories. The only way this would result in a net gain in value is if, somehow, the ccTLDs attract more value during the time they're live than would the directories, even after losses through eventual redirection. But I can see no ...


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