18

I'd be willing to bet that your colleague implemented on-page events. By default Google Anaytics only measures page views. Bounces are defined as users who only view one page; even if that user spends hours on one page. Events allow you to track what happens within the page. You can send GA information about items such as: User clicking on buttons ...


7

Google is almost certainly using usability signals as a significant factor in the rankings. Google probably doesn't use "bounce rate", at least not as measured by Google Analytics. Instead, Google relies on: Click through rate (CTR) - The number of people that click from the SERPs to a site is a good indication of whether the site is relevant for the ...


6

Google says: By default, the event hit sent by _trackEvent() is considered an interaction hit, which means that it is included in bounce rate calculations. So if someone triggers one of your events, it is then not considered a bounce. You can get around this by adding an opt_noninteraction parameter to your _trackEvent()


6

A bounce occurs when a visitor looks at the page and then leaves the site, ie. doesn't go through to another internal page. This would happen all the time if you had a 1 page website. Another cause may be that you have very few call to actions drawing users to other pages, or your page gives them all the info they need so they don't need to go to another ...


5

I had a similar experience. The bounce rate of one of my sites suddenly went down to 20%, then to 0%. I first thaught maybe people are just that interested in our site. In the end what I found was that we had a duplicate Google Analytics tracking code in the head section. The tracking code was already inserted via the Wordpress theme and then I added it ...


4

In Analytics: Acquisition > Channels click on "Organic Search" - this gives the report with the evolution of organic traffic. On the top of this graph you see Sessions vs (Select a Metric) - click on the (Select a Metric) and start typing "Bounce rate" in the search field - select when the field appears. This should be the graph you're looking for.


4

The direct answer to the Bounce rate concept has been answered before, here. From Google Analytics Help Center: Bounce rate is the percentage of single-page visits or visits in which the person left your site from the entrance (landing) page. There are a number of factors that contribute to a high bounce rate. For example, users might leave your ...


4

It's obvious that this page is very important for users, but if users don't register another page view on your site, it doesn't matter what they do on this page - it will result in a bounce, as you are experiencing. Set-up conversion tracking within Google Analytics. Your conversion action or goal within google analytics could be a "download" see image ...


3

The default Google Analytics installation measures bounce rate as "the percentage of single-page visits or visits in which the person left your site from the entrance (landing) page." Your 85% bounce rate isn't worrying to me because in my experience GA's default bounce rate measurement doesn't lead to actionable metrics. Many users find what they are ...


3

I don't think it's negative SEO, my guess is that you are facing bot's traffic. Check if that traffic matches those indicators: Low average session duration. High bounce rate (checked). Mostly new visitors. No goal completion. In order to minimize the 'bad traffic' take into consideration the following actions: Make sure you exclude traffic from spiders ...


2

From Google Analytics perspective it makes no difference if you use _blank or not. Google Analytics will still see 2 pageviews in any case. If the link goes away from your site then _blank could even reduce the Bounce Rate, but from a usability point of view not from a technical point of view. _blank open a new window/tab instead of using the current one ...


2

Actually Bounce rate is the factor that indicates the ratio between number of visitors viewing only one page of your site and the number of entries to our site. If you get high bounce rate means viewers are closing your site without viewing more pages and spending less time in your site. I saw your site and it looks nice. I have a question for you 1. Did you ...


2

The reason for that is the way Google calculates bounce rate, and how it represents the totals per page. First look at this explanation of bounce rate: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2525491?hl=en For all sessions that start with the page, Bounce Rate is the percentage that were the only one of the session. Bounce Rate for a page is ...


2

Google is not the all seeing omnipresent Goomba of the Internet. How do you suppose they will know what happens on your site once a visitor gets there? Are you making the assumption that Google Analytics (GA) is a Google Search spy? Seriously, people give Google far too much power even if it is sometimes only in their mind. Google will not know that someone ...


2

Non-interaction events would cause this behavior. Senario: User loads page User reads the article for 24 minutes Browser sends non-interactive event to Google Analytics User closes the browser In that case Google would know that the user stuck around for the 24 minutes, but because the non-interactive flag was set on the event, they would still be ...


2

Yes, but you'll need to manually configure Google Analytics to track virtual pageviews. When adding the tracking script, you'll need to add a page parameter to the send method that specifies the pathname (i.e. /about-us), which you would update dynamically when the AJAX calls are made and the user transitions to a new pathname. It should look something like ...


2

Bounce Rate is a major factor in how Google gauges user satisfaction with your site. A higher bounce rate can indicate dissatisfaction or satisfaction. Confused? Some sites answers the users question immediately. In this case, a high bounce rate is good. Data driven sites are good for this. Still over-all, you want to reduce your bounce rate, and increase ...


2

The three metrics are are all different. Bounces: the number people that come to your website, view one page, and leave. Exits: The number of people who exit from the site on that page. This metric counts sessions that start anywhere on the site. Drop offs: A drop off occurs when someone exits the user flow that you are viewing. This does not necessarily ...


2

First of all a bounce rate of 2% is highly unlike and occurs mostly when tracking is incorrect due to pageviews being double counted. Now it has been fixed so thats the reason why you are seeing the correct bounce rate. Secondly notice that you pages per session has dropped 50% which means that if a page was being counted twice Now it is counted once For ...


2

Google Analytics offers a built-in segment of Bounced users, which can be applied to various reports, including the ones containing the stats, you are looking for. If you are looking into this information especially on session level, you can create your own segment for this. Just apply the following condition to a new segment under Advanced tab of new ...


2

20% is a very low bounce rate. I know it depends on the website, however, as a general benchmark, I would trust that the 40% is more true to life. Particularly as your bounce rate dropped considerably in April 2015. It is likely that you implemented something in April 2015 such as some event tracking which was not set to non-interaction which considerably ...


2

The bounce rate is measured much the same way as you would see in any web analytics tool. In this case it is measured per visit/session. Alexa's data is provided by users in the global data panel. These users are people who use Alex's browser extensions and plug-ins such as the Alexa's Toolbar.


2

Add this code to your snippet on pages that you need adjusted bounce rate to. You are trying to make old ga.js code with gtag.js code. setTimeout("gtag('event', 'adjusted bounce rate', {'event_label':'more than 15 sec'})",15000 );


2

Google Analytics by default only measures time on page between page views. All in-page interactions such as button presses, mouse movement, and scrolling do not cause any data to be sent to Google Analytics. You need to implement events for in page interactions that you want to count towards time on the page. That includes button presses that don't load ...


2

The bounce rate, generally becomes low when any of the following changes are done: Better Landing Page Experience Content served to the user is highly valuable compared to others No changes on-page are made but traffic from a low quality source, stopped coming. To understand why, check the following with your Analytics and colleague: Any changes to ...


2

As you are likely to be aware, a Bounce is where someone visits a single page on a website and then leaves. Often, this is perfectly normal. For example: Example One: A browser visits a One-Page website. By design, all of the information is on one page where the visitor does not have any options to click through to any other page; Example Two: Let's ...


2

Google does not use SERP bounce rate ("pogo sticking") as a ranking factor. Google only knows the bounce rate for visitors coming from Google Search. They do not reach into anyone's Google Analytics accounts to get that info - besides, many websites do not have Google Analytics installed anyway. Even though they know this bounce rate, they do not ...


2

It appears that your worst performing traffic, bounce wise, is referral and it began May 2nd. I would recommend opening the analytics for your Acquisition > All Traffic > Referrals and take a look at what site specifically started sending you more visitors that seem to be low quality, or seeking information your site is not providing. If there is an ...


1

Your two bullet points are a distinction without a difference. The bounce rate shown in Google Analytics is calculated by the users clicking back from a visit from Google. The actual effect of Bounce Rate on the SERPS is an unknown variable since Google doesn't release this info. I can tell you from personal, anecdotal experience that reducing my site's ...


1

Nothing you do in Google Analytics can effect search performance. It is an analytics program that reports what has already happened. Your filtering referrer spam in analytics only effects the reports you see. Nothing more.


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