12

If you do not have specific experience running this kind of websites, then I would strongly suggest you to get a separate server. While having an adult site on same server with different websites might not affect your non-adult sites directly, there are plenty of things that can go wrong (e.g. IP flagged/blacklisted for "spam"-like emails, content IP-blocked ...


9

Apparently, the Acceptable Use Policy has changed and now adult content is allowed. Greg D'Alesandre, Senior Product Manager for Google App Engine has even stated it explicitly here: I was wondering when someone was gonna notice. This was not a mistake. The new policy does not prohibit pornography nor gambling. The policy was written to disallow ...


5

Absolutely do not 301 redirect any old link to the site. The assumption would be that the link and page are valid and they will remain in the search engines indexes as a result. 404 all of these pages and let them drop from the index. It will take quite a while. As well, search engines will continue to follow these old links as long as they exist. There is ...


5

Do you mean with regards to search? From Google's point of view: no, that's fine. There are a limited number of IP addresses, so you need to share. The only exception I can think of is if you have a ton of really spammy sites on a server, and just a tiny number of good ones, but that doesn't sound like your situation. In cases like that, we / our ...


4

This is not legal advice, but I know someone who runs several adult sites. He puts up the warning page with the 18 U.S.C. Section 2257 Compliance Notice and that's it. I'm not sure there is a way to verify a users age when they are underage. Obviously this is not enough, the parents may have to employ tools to prevent access. The site owner has no other ...


4

There is no way to do ensure someone is over 18 without additional work (either from you or the viewer or both). Having people register and require scanned ID or similar could work, as could require entry of a valid credit card number to create an account. Neither of these are anywhere close to fullproof, but they significantly raise the bar in terms of ...


4

From https://support.google.com/adsense/answer/4410771 Google ads may not be placed on content that provides tips regarding sexual performance or discusses some treatments of sexual health issues. Examples include, but are not limited to: advice about improving sexual performance discussions and/or images of sexually transmitted diseases ...


4

Adsense policies are clear about sexual content, ads cannot be displayed next to such content. I guess they don't make a difference between porn and scientific sex conversations. If I were you, I would stop doing it right now, or you might be banned from AdSense.


3

You could potentially implement Google's first click free policy (FCF) for this. FCF is designed to allow search bots and search visitors to access content that would typically be available only to logged in users. To implement it you would need to: Allow search bots (based on user agent) to crawl the content without being required to log in. Allow ...


3

I'd like to correct the answer above with new information: It is now not explicitly forbidden. This is new as of the advent of Google Cloud Platform; You can read their Acceptable Use Policy for full details.


2

this http://www.webpronews.com/could-googles-safesearch-be-costing-you-traffic-by-filtering-your-safe-images-2013-10 may help you, but in general check the following: check your text content and image filenames for things that Google could view as adult words make sure your outbound links aren’t pointing to any adult areas make sure you’re not hosted on the ...


2

Hmm, it appears that these standards are both somewhat dead. And I see why, I have no desire to help the content filter authors 'classify' my site. I merely want to tag not appropriate for minors so to avoid the attack of parent groups. This tag seems to be what the majority of sites use: <meta name="RATING" content="RTA-5042-1996-1400-1577-RTA" />


2

If a website main content loaded via Ajax (but not the Advertisement, Header and Footer). So Google adsense or Google can not able to find violation in the page. Is this correct? It used to be, but not anymore. Google bots can now crawl ajax and javascript content. If a website displays main content only by visitor login (but not the Advertisement, ...


2

Nope, nope and nope. Why would someone put a child pornography into a service that sole purpose is content analysis? It wouldn't go through. But, srsly, don't go on that road. It's illegal content, so you got your answer in the word ILLEGAL. And I think that I don't need to remind you how community is sensitive in this particular case.


2

I'm leaving the legal part to others, I'm replying about the implementation: Using an index.html is a terrible idea. Say you website has pages indexed somewhere, or some forum has a few backlinks. If they where to link to example.com/some-page(.html), they would never see the warning. Use PHP (or another language which can store sessions), and if !isset($...


2

Also: study the html of other adult websites hosted in the same geographical location as your host. See what they do to label their content as adult, so parental controls can pick it up and prevent unintended access by minors. Also visit the websites of parental control products like NetNanny, and follow their advice. It won't keep out determined minors, ...


2

What an interesting question. It all depends on how you expect the users to use your site: If you want users to visit your adult site for a minute just to get one or two things, then at the very least, have the users read an agreement, then verify they read it by having them answer a skill-testing question that adults can only understand and then if ...


2

I'll give you a simple answer. Yes. Legally, just the notice would help you out of the trouble. But, if you need to verify their identity, the solution would go complex. To either get a video or webcam snap, check for age using image recognition etc.


2

Where you decide to advertise is not relevant because advertising links should always be nofollow and therefore will not pass on rankings, or relevancy. Advertising links are classified as paid links and failure to comply with Google's guidelines will eventually be translated into a penalty of some sort. Paid Links Paid links: A site's ranking in ...


1

From experience I can tell you it will skew your clientele toward more adult sites and away from non-adult sites. This is a natural result. Adult site owners are looking for friendly site developers while companies will shy away from a developer that does adult sites. That is a given. As for a penalty, that depends upon the site, what happens to the site in ...


1

Links are links - there isn't a penalty for an adult site vs a non-adult site. I've even had hosted pages on our company site that linked back and forth to swinger sites with no repercussions or noticeable differences to other more mainstream events. The danger comes from what context the link is in. Because the content of these sites is clearly ...


1

When you advertize through an ad network, using, for example, pop-under ads or banner ads - those are not backlinks. Google Analytics will show them as "referrals" as in where that visitor happened to come from that time (or, actually more likely, it wont show the site at all, it'll show your d network's adserver domain) - In any event, they're not even ...


1

Simply state that it is your legal and ethical duty to uphold the integrity of your company by not affiliating yourself either directly or indirectly with any form of illegal activity (child pornography is illegal no matter where in the world you are). Refuse his business, if he's provided you with an email address or you have his IP address or anything of ...


1

Based on the Removal Type column in your screen shot being "SafeSearch page filtering", and the fact that acknowledge that it's adult content, I think that likely somebody has reported your site to Google as being adult content, or offensive in some manner. Users can submit adult content URLs at https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/safesearch. Google ...


1

If anyone cares, this is what our ultimate resolution was Logged in users: Get a "this page has moved" message on http://original.com/path with a link to the new page at http://new.com/path Non logged in users: Get a 301 redirected to http://new.com/path We did this using custom Django middleware on both sides and the Django messaging framework to add ...


1

I like everything except for the When googlebot loads an adult sub-url, they get a 301 redirect to the new site. part. Show Google the same content the user's will see at the old URL. The canonical URL will ensure they know the new page is the URL you want shown in their search results so it's okay if they crawl it. Then the eventual 301 redirect 60 days ...


1

Those pages should still return a status 200 OK header response. You'd just serve a meta="noindex, nofollow" in the of those pages to prevent Google from crawling and indexing them.


1

Just removing the adult site from that IP address won't cause your images to start popping up immediately in normal image search results. A better option would be to maybe move the normal sites to a different IP address and let the Adult site sit on that IP address. It is possible that the IP address has been marked as being a host for Adult content and it ...


1

This is probably "referrer SPAM". These people drive traffic to their own website by making fake website requests with their website as referrer. If possible try to ignore them. Does this solve your question?


1

You know CCBill is the most popular their payment pages may look out dated but why not use their API and create your own pages. http://www.ccbill.com/developers/api.php


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