New answers tagged

0

I've seen similar items that on my site. Interesting query string - referrer (google.com) being passed in query string After watching it for several months, I decided it was from tools that are designed to anonymize the user's data. It's possible that your traffic is coming from a specific search functionality of the stwl dot xyz site or that their site ...


2

Google considers redirecting to a non-equivalent page to be a soft 404 error. Google tries to treat redirects to parent pages the same as a 404 error. It is unlikely to help your SEO to redirect the URLs to the directory listing page rather than let them return a "404 Not Found" error. It would help your SEO if you could redirect old events to a ...


0

Even for SEO, you're better off thinking about your users' experience IMO. If a user experiences a 404, it's frustrating and your user may leave your site entirely. What if you redirect them to a page that says, "This previous event is no longer available. For a list of future events, see the list below." or something similar? When you approach ...


2

If you don't mind the event URLs going away, then there shouldn't be anything wrong with letting them 404. If they had links or traffic worth keeping, the page would be worth keeping. So in other words if you get a bunch of 404 errors you probably took down the wrong URLs. You could track 301s also, but again that takes effort to set up and 404 is the code ...


2

Check the server's "access log". This is really the main way to check for what URLs are being requested that are triggering 404s. "Crawling a site" checks for broken (internal) links. GSC is reporting on internal links and backlinks. (But if you "don't have access to [even] conduct a crawl on or check google search console", ...


Top 50 recent answers are included