24

You can't redirect your old sites without losing 90% of their value and risking a penalty on your new site. There usually isn't a huge cost to leaving old sites up and running. You could use them to advertise your new site. Put a banner about your new site on every page of your old sites.


12

First, something that's implied in other answers, but should probably be spelled out: the situation you describe is something Google actively wants to discourage -- you're not "collateral damage" in their fight against spammers, you are their intended target in their fight against irrelevant and 'deceptive' results. ('Deceptive' in the sense that you think ...


10

Quantcast Measure Terms of Service (https://www.quantcast.com/terms/measure-terms-service/) Section 6: Quantcast servers may choose to occasionally respond to any publisher’s Tag by redirecting the browser to a third-party anonymous beacon to support the provision of Quantcast services in market. The decision to beacon is not related to you the publisher, ...


7

Bad Idea! Never, I repeat NEVER do that. I tried that 3 days ago and after couple of days the site to which I redirected completely lost all its rankings. Not even it was ranking on searching domain.com in Google. All indexed pages are still there but the site lost its ranking completely. I can provide the links of the sites as proof but that's not allowed ...


7

I think there may be (or may have been) a few scenarios that can trigger this "redirect notice" from the Google SERPs. Some of these may have been historical "glitches" judging by some of the articles I stumbled across. I have certainly seen this "redirect notice" several times directly from Google search results in recent times, however, I've not been able ...


6

This should do the trick: header("HTTP/1.0 302 Moved Temporarily"); header("Location: example.com/whatever"); header("Cache-Control: private"); header("Vary: User-Agent, Accept-Encoding"); exit; The recommendation for the Vary header is from this google developer page about optimizing caches (and problems with some IE < 9). Background on caching ...


6

As Stephen points out in comments, geo-IP redirects are generally bad for SEO (it prohibits the site from being crawled naturally and can at times hinder users through being redirected incorrectly). However, specialized bikes would appear to get around the SEO issues with sitemaps containing the different language versions (hreflang). (And only redirecting ...


5

I highly suspect this is cookie matching with various audience data/analytics providers and ad companies. It seems to be covered in their privacy policy, albeit fairly vaguely: We may share with third parties Non-PII, including certain Log Data, as part of providing and improving our Measure and Advertise products. For example, we may disclose such data ...


5

301 Redirects are completely fine if they're real. If you had an old site and then decided to move/combine it with some other related site, there's absolutely no problem putting up a 301 redirect on the old site to send users to the new site. You should not be penalized for this in Google and if you are, they're completely reasonable about fixing it if you ...


5

One thing that all your sites have in common is you. Why not throw a designed by link at the bottom of your site that links to your "portfolio" where your new business is prominently displayed.


4

It sounds like you've answered your own question. As per Google's documentation, the redirection method doesn't matter, though I must say I too would lean towards using 302 – as your colleague says, both URLs are valid and using 302 is common in other conditional redirect scenarios. However doing either without using Google's recommended Vary and rel="...


4

If it's temporary, then you should use a temporary solution! A 301 tells the search engine that the page has moved, permanently. As a result, search engines will remove your main page from the index and index the new page instead. I can't tell how long it might take for search engines to do this, but it shouldn't be a long time. On the other hand, a 302 ...


4

Your first two requests are the same. All clients (including curl) have to send the slash after the domain name as part of the HTTP request whether or not it is on the URL. There is no way to formulate a valid HTTP request without it. A minimal HTTP request is: GET / HTTP/1.0 host: jekyllrb.com Omitting the slash from that will result in a "400 bad ...


4

Reading through your questions it seems to me that you think that you only need to do one redirect. That is the case if you are moving a carbon copy of the site. If you changed things around then it gets a little trickier. What would be the best redirect to use? 301 redirect is best if you are moving your site permanently. Here is a great article about ...


4

The best thing to do is not worry about the traffic to your old sites. I had a good friend who graduated from Harvard Business. He told stories about how Harvard drummed into his head the mantra of "Know when to cut your losses." every day one way or another. From a business perspective, this is excellent advice! It is good advice in life too!! You are ...


4

Whilst I'd definitely always 301 http to https (as why would it ever be temporary?), Google have said that 301, 302, 30x do not dilute your pagerank in SEO. The team at MOZ have recently studied this, and IIRC they're not so convinced. If it was my site, I'd definitely tell/bribe whoever did your 302s, and get them to do 301s.


4

Sometimes when you share a URL from a single result in SERP with someone that didn't perform the search, the redirect notices appears. This is for preventing click and CTR manipulation by having fake entrances (clicks that don't actually happen and is generated by an expired Google SERP URL. ) Also it might indicate your site is hacked and is redirecting ...


4

It is always a good idea to "test" with 302 (temporary) redirects in order to avoid the caching of erroneous redirects - as you have stated. Ordinarily "testing" is just a matter of running your own tests in development before going live. tl;dr I don't see any problem in going live with a 302 in this instance and changing to 301 later. The "only" duplicate ...


3

If you redirect a page to another page, then Google will no longer index the redirected page. Implementing a redirect removes the content. If you are moving a site from one domain to another without changing the content, you can use the change of address feature in Google Webmaster Tools. When doing so, your new site will take the place of your old site ...


3

I generally advise against this. The reason is simple. There often is little to no value in actually changing domain names. Having said that, there are times where a domain name change is required. The simplest way to do this is to set-up a blanket 301 redirect from your old domain to your new domain name. In the case where a page is removed, and you want ...


3

The type of redirect you are using is not the problem. 301 redirects are cacheable. In fact they are extremely hard to cache bust. 301 means "permanent" and browsers are very likely to cache 301 redirects with no way with the server to undo one that is already cached. 302 redirects are generally not cached by default unless other headers indicate that ...


3

302 Caching A 302 response code would only be cached if accompanied with the Cache-Control or Expires headers. There is no explicit or embedded cache information within a 302 response. According to RFC 2616, section 10.3.3 302 Found The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection might be altered on occasion, ...


3

By applying redirect from your home page to a random post, you can confuse visitors. For example and especially when visitors click on a link like www.example.com (your home page URL), they expect see your home page, not a post. Moreover, you can also confuse Googlebot and other search engines bots (and thus SEO) if the home page is always redirected to a ...


3

While Will is correct that the retry-after value is optional, I'd suggest setting it anyway as a matter of practice. Setting the value has the benefit of being unambiguous. A 503 without retry-after "should be handled as a 500." If any crawler/script/etc. requesting the documents has been configured to treat 500 differently, then you can't be entirely ...


3

Redirection is the process of forwarding one URL to a different URL. There are three main kinds of redirects: 301, 302, and meta refresh. Types of Redirects 301, "Moved Permanently"—recommended for SEO 302, "Found" or "Moved Temporarily" Meta Refresh A redirect is a way to send both users and search engines to a different URL from the one they originally ...


3

Yes, sort of. Put yourself in the visitors shoes (with google at their back) and ask how you can introduce your new content to them in a relevant way. ie old site is about say hiking and new one is about music recording services add content to the hiking site aimed at say hikers who like to bring their guitars along on hikes to play encouraging them to ...


3

there are approximately 2 status codes to trigger a redirect More like 5 ... 301, 302, 303, 307 and 308. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_HTTP_status_codes#3xx_Redirection 302 - Moved Temporarily A 302 should never be cached. Browsers do not ordinarily cache a 302. It is after all "temporary". 301 - Moved Permanently 301s are cached by ...


3

You could use an error 401 = You are not authorised to view this page However read this: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3297048/403-forbidden-vs-401-unauthorized-http-responses A 301 redirect means that the page has permanently moved to a new location. A 302 redirect means that the move is only temporary A 404 redirect means that the page can't be ...


3

The answer is, ironically, in your title. [insert grin] Use a canonical link. You can read Googles page here: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066?hl=en In the <head> section of b.example/bar, use a link like this: <link rel="canonical" href="https://a.example.com/foo" /> Google will see that a.example.com/foo is preferred and ...


2

The Retry-After header is optional. It if is specified, then it helps search engines determine when it's appropriate to crawl your site again.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible