25

There are a few resources on Wikipedia, but you'd have to be quite lucky indeed to have a domain that's a plain vanilla English word, common enough to appear here. Lists of Common misspellings Commonly misspelled words You could use the keyword typo generator tool, or something like it, then laboriously enter each one into Google -- which ironically will ...


24

You can't redirect your old sites without losing 90% of their value and risking a penalty on your new site. There usually isn't a huge cost to leaving old sites up and running. You could use them to advertise your new site. Put a banner about your new site on every page of your old sites.


15

According to the current version of the HTTP/1.1 standard, RFC 2616, the value of the Location header must be an absolute URI. However, in the draft standard prepared by the HTTPbis Working Group to eventually replace RFC 2616, this has been changed to allow relative URIs as well, apparently because: "The definition of the Location header [in RFC 2616] ...


12

If the proper steps are followed, Google should replace the HTTP indexed URLs with the HTTPS ones over time, during which you may experience a dip in your rankings. The steps to follow are outlined here: Google Webmaster Tools - Moving your site. Expanding on those: Use 301 redirects Update internal and external links Update the URLs in your sitemap Update ...


12

First, something that's implied in other answers, but should probably be spelled out: the situation you describe is something Google actively wants to discourage -- you're not "collateral damage" in their fight against spammers, you are their intended target in their fight against irrelevant and 'deceptive' results. ('Deceptive' in the sense that you think ...


12

The problem with reusing a 301-URL is that some browsers will cache the redirect for a very long time, see, for example: How long do browsers cache HTTP 301s? 301 Redirects: The Horror That Cannot Be Uncached So, theoretically, there could be users that are automatically redirected from contact to contact-us, even though you have disabled the redirection ...


11

Why not get a free SSL certificate from Lets Encrypt, then your https will work. Ride the horse in the direction it is going...


11

This is actually outdated. It is now stated that there is no link equity lost through 301 redirects. However, there are still risks linked with changing the URL structure and redirecting. For example, all pages which are redirected to must be relevant (i.e. is it just a URL change redirecting to the previous version of the page or are you redirecting to a ...


10

If the root (/) 301 redirect to /en/, Google will most probably consider your homepage is http://www.example.com/en/ and there is no problem not to have a root (/) page. Regarding Google guidelines for multilingual sites, you can use this method to separate languages on your site.


9

Interesting problem. You could use google's keyword search tool at https://adwords.google.com/o/KeywordTool to find out how many searches per month are performed for each of your domain name typos (you'd have to generate a typo list with the tool you mention above). Not perfect, but would represent actual user typos and give you some decent data to go on. (...


9

Store your old and new redirect paths in a database. Redirect 404 errors to a special 404 page. With Apache and PHP, you could do this with the ErrorDocument directive in your .htaccess: ErrorDocument 404 /404.php In the 404.php script, get the referring page with $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'], look up the old URL path in your database, and serve a 301 redirect ...


8

While its not bad advice from the SEO company I do feel its a little incomplete, there's a tag that you can use on your pages to avoid duplicates finding their way into the index of search engines such as Google. Better Advice The better advice from the SEO company would be to ensure that your using Rel Canonical on your pages so no pages ever end up in ...


8

Mod_alias and Mod_rewrite There are 2 modules you can use within the htaccess for controlling redirects these are known as mod_alias and mod_rewrite. To help you establish the difference between the two below is some commands to familiarize when you're using mod_alias or mod_rewrite. mod_alias commands Alias AliasMatch Redirect RedirectMatch ...


8

It takes weeks for Google and other search engines to de-index pages and even longer for a website, which would in time would hurt your rankings. The only thing you need to do is return a status 503 rather than a 301 to 404. This is the definition of the 503 status code from the RFC that defines these status codes: The server is currently unable to ...


7

Check out the URL removal tool in Google Webmaster Tools. I'd also 404 the pages instead of redirecting them to get them removed faster, in the future beyond robots.txt you could drop in the rel="canonical" to make sure Google knows the dev site is just a copy of the main site and is not to be indexed.


7

Technically speaking http://www.new.com/tag/relationships and http://www.new.com/tag/relationships/ are two different pages just like http://www.example.com/ and http://www.example.com/index.html are two different pages even though they pull up the same page. To make sure the search engines understand that http://www.new.com/tag/relationships and http://www....


7

Don't over-optimize. Make sure the pages all have unique page titles and descriptions. Make sure the title attributes (not to be confused with the <title> tag) don't just replicate what the text link says. Make sure the pages load as fast or faster, accessibility doesn't get worse, you use a XML sitemap... Also a good idea to do a full analysis of ...


7

To redirect requests for sub.example.com/uri to example.com/uri: RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^sub.example.com$ RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://example.com/$1 [R=301,L] To redirect requests for sub.example.com/uri to example.com: RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^sub.example.com$ RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://example.com/ [R=301,L]


7

The Penguin update penalises sites that have a high proportion of "unnatural" inbound links. One thing that constitutes unnatural inbound links is identical anchor text used in a high proportion of those links. In this report from Open Site Explorer for your URL, there are 22,735 links containing the anchor text "sydney web design". Proportionally, these ...


7

Google says that it is best to retain control (and 301 redirecting) of your old site for at least 180 days to avoid any confusion Source: http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=83105


7

As long as all the secondary domains simply do a 301 Permanent Redirect to the primary domain, this will not negatively affect SEO at all. It probably wont have any positive effects either, but if you value owning those domains (even if just to ensure noone else uses them) then that may be immaterial. Replicating the content on all the different domains ...


7

If the domains are serving duplicate content, or even similar content with minor variations, you run the risk of being penalized for that by the search engines. At least, that's my understanding from all of the articles I've read. Irrespective of that, there are many reasons you should be using the <link rel="canonical" href="..." /> tag in your page ...


7

Bad Idea! Never, I repeat NEVER do that. I tried that 3 days ago and after couple of days the site to which I redirected completely lost all its rankings. Not even it was ranking on searching domain.com in Google. All indexed pages are still there but the site lost its ranking completely. I can provide the links of the sites as proof but that's not allowed ...


7

Yes it is common. We get questions about it here all the time: Huge drop (50%) in traffic after HTTPS move Search traffic dropped with HTTPS implementation Organic Traffic down after HTTPS (SSL) move (2 months passed) Why my website is excluding from search results after migration to https? Which penalties are possible when switching from HTTP to HTTPS ...


7

Google will never index HTTPS while the canonicals point to HTTP. I switched my largest site over to HTTPS using the following protocol: Enabled HTTPS for the site without switching canonicals for about two years. During this time period Google sent all traffic to HTTP. Switched the canonical version to HTTPS. It has been running that way for about 8 ...


6

You can use JavaScript to redirect them with code in the <body> of the page. It won't be a 301 redirect, however, as you can only do that with HTTP headers. <script type="text/javascript"> window.location = "http://www.example.com/" </script>


6

Section 14.30 of the HTTP 1.1 RFC http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.30 is not significantly different. I don't know that you're going to see any actual practical limitations for this. The only time I've seen even a warning about this issue is when I used to test in Lynx and the location was not absolute it would warn you "Location ...


6

This should do the trick: header("HTTP/1.0 302 Moved Temporarily"); header("Location: example.com/whatever"); header("Cache-Control: private"); header("Vary: User-Agent, Accept-Encoding"); exit; The recommendation for the Vary header is from this google developer page about optimizing caches (and problems with some IE < 9). Background on caching ...


6

1. Although all pages in example.com are being 301 redirected to example2.com, why are my users now about 50% of old user count? If you're using the same tracking code and all pages have been redirected properly, the lower numbers you're seeing are likely due to a change in search engine results because your domain has changed. This is to be expected, and ...


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