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Results tagged with Search options user 8466

HTML (HyperText Markup Language) is the predominant markup language used for creating web pages. In modern web pages, HTML is used to markup the contents of the website, while CSS and Javascript are used to define the styles and behaviors respectively.

8
votes
That <h1> will be the heading for the <nav> section and not the page as a whole. <nav> is its own sectioning element and won't affect the page's SEO.
answered Jan 27 '13 by Rob
21
votes
Only in the sense that your page will download faster and Google gives you points for that because a faster page load is a better user experience. Otherwise, minimizing your page has no other impact.
answered Jan 1 '16 by Rob
1
vote
are trying to trick them. The exception may be that you aren't changing the order of the HTML and content using Flex. Nor are you hiding the content. But any time you try manipulating things for search engines, you run a risk of getting penalized. …
answered Oct 11 '16 by Rob
1
vote
That would be a disaster and Google warns you never to do that. Serving pages that are different than what a user would view is considered black hat and will get you banned and put on wanted posters i …
answered Nov 24 '16 by Rob
3
votes
Search engines will consider the phrase within the heading. Spans are not used to break up phrases. According to the HTML spec, spans mean nothing on their own. …
answered Nov 8 '14 by Rob
4
votes
a) Use as many as you need but IDs are there for a reason and can serve a purpose. The problem with IDs is the same one might have with global variables in javascript. That one may forget the ID is us …
answered May 4 '14 by Rob
1
vote
This is easy. Add this in your <head> <meta name=viewport content='width=device-width, initial-scale=1'> This tells browsers to scale the page to something other than their default view. For more …
answered Oct 13 '16 by Rob
1
vote
You're right. Two h1 elements in the same section is not a good idea, semantically or structurally, but it's not a HTML error. It's most likely a copy/paste error on their part but who knows why some …
answered Jun 22 '16 by Rob
3
votes
styling! If you want to style it, use CSS. Otherwise, <strong> isn't needed at all and you can use <div> or some other element like a <span> (more relevant). So let's see what the HTML standard has to … > for everything and be done with it. But Google is the chief editor for the HTML web standards. If Google didn't really care, why is it so important to them to supply an employee to do such a thing for …
answered Dec 19 '17 by Rob
1
vote
If you won't be moderating it, then don't put one there. It WILL draw in the worst of the internet. Do what better sites do. Don't allow comments. Less than a third of all comments are beneficial an …
answered Nov 6 '16 by Rob
2
votes
The span element doesn't mean anything on its own. https://developers.whatwg.org/text-level-semantics.html#the-span-element This element is used as a hook for styling or javascript access and do …
answered Jun 21 '16 by Rob
0
votes
A <h1> element inside a <p> is invalid HTML so don't even think of doing that. Your SEO "expert" is ignorant of HTML rules, SEO and Google's stated values. And those stated values are that Google …
answered Nov 17 '16 by Rob
6
votes
No. The href must point to an absolute URI. Relative is not allowed on a base element. This attribute specifies an absolute URI that acts as the base URI for resolving relative URIs. The HTML5 …
answered Apr 7 '16 by Rob
1
vote
identify the content of those elements, or the content overall, using schema.org, JSON-LD and all those various vocabularies, attributes and properties. With those, the semantics of the HTML
answered Nov 29 '16 by Rob
2
votes
While hiding <h1> can cause you problems, it depends on how you use it. However, we have no way of knowing what specifically Google looks for. In our case, we hide <h1> on our index page because it wo …
answered Nov 7 '13 by Rob

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