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What is the Domain ID in the WHOIS record and when and how it will be used?

WHOIS for wikimedia.org:

Domain ID: D95346862-LROR

Is this similar to Registry Domain ID?

WHOIS for stackexchange.com:

Registry Domain ID: 1558969914_DOMAIN_COM-VRSN

It seems the Domain ID for all .org TLDs ends with -LROR and .com ends with _DOMAIN_COM-VRSN. I think VRSN stands for Verisign, but what does LROR means?

closed as off-topic by closetnoc, dan Aug 22 '16 at 4:25

  • This question does not appear to be about webmastering within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I am sorry. How an organization decides to generate an ID for their database of domain names is of no consequence to anything I might do in creating and running my own website. Each organization may be creating their own ID according to what is important to their operation. I do not believe there is a single format. So to answer the question, one would have to know something about each and every registrar or at least a few of the major registrars. Still, how is knowing this beneficial in the end? It is an interesting question. It would be interesting to know. But not necessary to know. Cheers! – closetnoc Aug 21 '16 at 16:03
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This is the unique ID assigned by the registry to the domain. Each registry have different policies, and even the WHOIS response is different from registry to registry.

It's reasonable to assume that the Domain ID for PIR (the .ORG registry) is equivalent to the Registry Domain ID for Verisign (the .COM registry).

The ID is not really used anywhere publicly. You don't need it to manage the domain, nor to perform WHOIS lookups. Is probably used internally by the registry to represent the domain, and you can use it in external systems to uniquely identify that specific domain instance as it should be guaranteed to be unique, but beyond that is not a particularly meaningful information.

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