4

On Apache 2.4, which is better for multiple migrated URLs in terms of SEO, 301 redirect or rewrite?

I have ~50 URLs.

5

It generally makes little difference.

A 301 redirect may cause a short term drop in ranking, but nothing to worry about.

An internal rewrite keeps the same URLs. You just need to be careful that you don't end up with duplicate content on multiple URLs.

  • Be aware that a 301 redirect is permanent. The browser might cache this redirect forever. If there is a chance that you will want to use the url again some day, do not use a 301. – tobltobs Apr 1 '16 at 13:15
2

mod_rewrite is the module that enables the redirection.

301 redirection should be done if you have a content on page A and not that has been migrated to a different subdomain or another link all-together.

So 301 redirect page A -> page B to indicate this to crawler to get complete seo authority passed from page A to B

  • So, which is preferable... a redirect or a rewrite? (You don't need to use mod_rewrite for redirection. mod_alias is preferred if you are only doing redirects.) – MrWhite Apr 2 '16 at 9:28
0

If you do choose to do a 301 redirect, you can set headers to stop the browser caching the redirect:

<ifModule mod_expires.c>
  ExpiresActive On
  ExpiresDefault "access plus 1 seconds"
</ifModule>

<ifModule mod_headers.c>
  <filesMatch "\$">
    Header set Cache-Control "store, no-cache, must-revalidate"
  </filesMatch>
</ifModule>

Possibly some adjustment is required on filesMatch depending on your redirects.

  • Why would you want to stop the browser caching the (migrated URL) redirect? (If you don't want the browser to cache the redirect it would be preferable to use a 302 (temporary) redirect.) – MrWhite Apr 2 '16 at 8:47

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