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At the moment I am using the current solution for pagination (without the view-all solution):

<link rel="prev" href="http://www.example.com/category/blablabla/page/2" />
<link rel="next" href="http://www.example.com/category/blablabla/page/4" />

Recently I've also added the hreflang attribute for multiple websites:

<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-US" href="http://www.example.com/category/blablabla/page/3">
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="sv-SE" href="http://www.example.com/kategori/blablabla-in-swedish/sida/3">

By the way the hreflang code I have created is generated on all sites, not only in the pagination site.

Do I need to add hreflang in a pagination site? If yes, then this might also be harder because all websites might not have the same amount of pages.

  • Does the English page 3 contain the same items like the Swedish page 3? Or could they be sorted differently, for example so that the blog post "Foo" is on page 3 in English and on page 2 in Swedish? – unor Jan 8 '16 at 16:03
  • as i wrote: Do I need to add hreflang in a pagination site? If yes, then this might also be harder because all websites might not have the same amount of pages. – Kilise Jan 8 '16 at 16:17
  • meaning there might not be same amount of items – Kilise Jan 8 '16 at 16:18
  • I read that, but thought it means that the English site might have 4 pages and the Swedish page 2 pages, but that the content for these first two pages could still possibly be the same in both sites. – unor Jan 8 '16 at 16:31
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    yeah it might be less items and the pages are derived from the items. some articles in the category might not be translated or being inactivated leading to less items in one of the sites – Kilise Jan 8 '16 at 16:33
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I think you should not do this (unless each English pagination page contains the same items like the Swedish pagination page with the same number).

alternate+hreflang should only be used for translations. But if your English page 3 could contain the items {A, B, C, D} and your Swedish page 3 could contain the items {B, D, E, F}, they aren’t really translations of each other. It wouldn’t make sense for a user to switch from English p. 3 to Swedish p. 3, because it could list totally different items (e.g., most of the items the user already saw on the English p. 2), and so it wouldn’t make sense for search engines to understand or show them as translations.

  • Looking at hotels.com, in the start page, they are using alternate + hreflang, but on all of their websites the hotel offers differs, according to the country of course... so If we lookup the fr.hotels.com we will get hotel results from paris and such, looking in uk.hotels.com we get hotels from london... So it doesn't look like they really are using their hreflang for translation only, because the different hotels are not really translations of each other. in moz.com article the hotels.com is shown as a good example of how to use hreflang. – Kilise Jan 10 '16 at 12:09

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