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I plan to advertise my business on porn websites, Due to low CPA cost. Though my business is not at all related to porn industry. I just want to try it.

When I get more PPC traffic from porn websites will it affect my organic results? Currently we are getting more business from SEO (Google organic) traffic.

Edited below for better clarification. Why I think, Advertising on porn websites might affect my SEO ranking.

  1. Due to back links from porn websites (with follow or no follow). If Ads are loaded using Javascript then this problem can be avoided.

  2. When more traffic comes from porn sites, Google can find out using analytic / web master tools / HTTP_REFFER this could potentially affect my SEO ranking.

I need answer for the above two points.

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  • There's no question here
    – John Conde
    Dec 15, 2015 at 13:51
  • @John Conde, If you dont understand this question, then i think, you may not have experience in internet marketing. Please re-read my question and let me know, What is not clear ?
    – Mani
    Dec 15, 2015 at 13:59
  • An influx of links from bad neighbourhoods such as porn sites, gambling sites, payday loan sites, etc. could be considered as negative links in SEO. So it will affect your ranking. - Reference moz.com/blog/preparing-for-negative-seo Dec 15, 2015 at 14:55
  • The selected answer mixes connected subjects. It may be a signal (with or without nofollow). Please, before going on, ask your question directly to Johannes Müller during a Google Webmaster Central Hangout session: sites.google.com/site/webmasterhelpforum/en/office-hours
    – Toto
    Dec 16, 2015 at 5:28

4 Answers 4

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Where you decide to advertise is not relevant because advertising links should always be nofollow and therefore will not pass on rankings, or relevancy. Advertising links are classified as paid links and failure to comply with Google's guidelines will eventually be translated into a penalty of some sort.

Paid Links

Paid links: A site's ranking in Google search results is partly based on analysis of those sites that link to it. In order to prevent paid links from influencing search results and negatively impacting users, we urge webmasters use nofollow on such links. Search engine guidelines require machine-readable disclosure of paid links in the same way that consumers online and offline appreciate disclosure of paid relationships (for example, a full-page newspaper ad may be headed by the word "Advertisement"). More information on Google's stance on paid links.

And more information here:

More information on Google's stance on paid links.

  • Text advertisements that pass PageRank
  • Advertorials or native advertising where payment is received for articles that include links that pass PageRank

Since it's believed that revancy is not passed through nofollow it will not make a difference where you host your adverts assumming that they are all nofollow, if they are follow then your simply asking for trouble and Google will eventually catch up with you.

If your that concerned, and if you want better results, host your advertising with a proper advertising agency that targets users on search history using cookies, similar to adwords, but obviously ones that care little about the content and don't care about advertising on shady sites, like porn and illegal download sites.

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  • I agree with your points, apart from link with follows and nofollows. But to analyse further, I think, Google nowadays gives importance to from where you are getting the traffic. Assume, My website gets more traffic from porn websites, google can find out this using web master tool & analytic & HTTP_REFERER . This could give a bad reputation for my website and hence affects the SEO ranking.
    – Mani
    Dec 16, 2015 at 4:42
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When you advertize through an ad network, using, for example, pop-under ads or banner ads - those are not backlinks. Google Analytics will show them as "referrals" as in where that visitor happened to come from that time (or, actually more likely, it wont show the site at all, it'll show your d network's adserver domain) - In any event, they're not even related. so No.

However, there is one huge success that comes to mind that was borne of a similar idea:

Eat24 - the 24 hour food delivery service. They had the brilliant marketing idea to advertize on Pornhub - because what do most guys want after they get their rocks off? a Sandwich and a nap - they were a startup at the time and had a lean ad budget - Adult Traffic can be 90% Cheaper than Mainstream Traffic - so it was a frugal gamble, but it paid off BIG - got them national attention.. .

Here is a story about it - and a ton of other huge name mainstream very much non-adult -related companies who now advertise on adult sites - Spoiler Alert - Diesel Jeans is one of them lol https://fightthenewdrug.org/these-major-companies-are-now-using-porn-sites-to-advertise-their-product/

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As mentioned already, it won't affect your SEO. But it is saying something about your website. But granted, if someone is already on a porn website, it shouldn't matter too much. I'd just stay away from having porn advertisements on your site, as it could hurt the number of non-porn viewing people visit it.

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  • I am not going to advertise porn on my website, I am going to advertise my business on porn websites.
    – Mani
    Dec 16, 2015 at 4:38
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I bet it does affect your SEO, and if you aren't in porn/adult, I bet it affects it negatively.

I'm just going off my gut feeling but aside from GWT & GA data, Google now parses and renders a lot of JS. Sure they understand ads, but they also understand links and relationships.

Even with rel=nofollow on those ads, you still have ads on, and links from, porn sites...unless you're selling herbal viagra or sex toys, I suspect you're playing with fire.

That said, please test it, measure your results an report back, I'm intrigued and I prefer data to guesses.

If you don't have an adult product, I'm also curious to know what your conversion rate and ROI will be.

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