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I was thinking over the month about buying a domain name. While browsing, I found a few domains called .ninja. I looked it up, finding out that the meaning is nothing too serious.

I want to search about other lesser known - uh, err.. This is where I got lost.

I have no idea what to call .com, .net, .gov etc. from domains we see. What are they called?

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They're called Top Level Domains or TLD for short.

A top-level domain (TLD) is one of the domains at the highest level in the hierarchical Domain Name System of the Internet.1 The top-level domain names are installed in the root zone of the name space. For all domains in lower levels, it is the last part of the domain name, that is, the last label of a fully qualified domain name. For example, in the domain name www.example.com, the top-level domain is com.

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Domain extensions like .com, .net, .org, .info, .biz, etc. are called generic top level domains (gTLD). Over the past few years, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has authorized additional extensions like .ninja, .today and .pro. These are also considered Generic Top Level Domains.

The other type are called country code top-level domains (ccTLD) and consist of two letters representing each country or territory. Some examples include .us, .uk, .cc, .li, .de, etc.

When referring to either type, they can be referred to as top-level domains (TLD) or simply as TLDs.

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I really like the fact that you can have meaning on the right side of the dot. While surely you're not literally a ninja, you could be the ninja in your field, so it helps support what you want to communicate.

I think we've still blinded ourselves regarding the use of .com, .net, .info, .biz etc., since they don't have any practical meaning. Surely changing habits after having the same morning routine for 30 years is difficult, but I think that in a few years from now, it seems absurd that we still preach them as better options than the new extensions.

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