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My web site is currently hosted in the US in NYC and SFO data center locations. I'm not too familiar with DNS, but both IP's point to my domain and the visitor's computer probably would pick the DNS that responds the quickest which would be local to them. (No, I do not want a third party hosting my DNS.)

Lately, I'm starting to see a lot of visitors coming to my web site from Europe, Asia, and very little from South America and Australia.

Since I'm not physically in another part of the world, I'm not sure how to test the latency of loading my web site and response times of DNS queries.

I see some sites that offer ns1.asia.example.com and ns1.euro.example.com to provide local DNS, but their web site IP is still from a US-owned class of IP's. So while DNS responses may be quicker, the web content is still traveling internationally.

Without going into much of a discussion, and sticking with a Q&A, will expanding internationally provide a benefit to users? Would moving to Europe (London or Frankfurt) suffice for Asia as well?

Content is a mix of static and dynamic. Expanding to Europe is estimated to be $15/mo on a cloud hosted environment providing DNS and Web.

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the visitor's computer probably would pick the DNS that responds the quickest which would be local to them

And how do you think that will happen? Unless you are already using a geo-aware DNS provider, it won't.

I'm not sure how to test the latency of loading my web site and response times of DNS queries

DNS queries are the least of your worries. Unless you have over-sharded your domains (which is really bad for performance) the overhead will be less than 200ms. But latency can really hurt your HTTP performance.

Since I'm not physically in another part of the world, I'm not sure how to test the latency of loading my web site

You don't have to be there to test from there.

estimated to be $15/mo

I'm guessing you can't afford professional advice. I would suggest reading a good book on web performance, but that might be a bit too advanced for now. The short answer is to stick with your current hosting and add a good CDN with geoaware replication and DNS. Move your DNS services to the CDN.

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