0

I have no access to the production server. I need to get all the configurations made to a web site that got it working in the first place.

The developers who did the deployment are now happy somewhere else, and I can only ask the IT department to get me information from server, they wont let me to browse it myself.

My question is how can I get all the settings/configurations required on that IIS server and permissions required for the directories under that site? Is there a tool I can tell the IT Department to use to get all non default specifics of website/web app/directory permissions etc. set up on the production server? Just getting a copy of directory wont tell me anything about the permissions and other specifics required to have the new updated site running in that environment.

Is there a smart way to approach this problem? The only thing I can think of is to get a fresh server and try to get the site running there documenting all the steps. Then handing the image and steps to IT people and hoping that what worked in one environment is going to work on a different environment! A bit of hit and miss really.

There are number of other sensitive applications/web sites/services running on that production server that there is no way I can get an image of the server for my trial and error experiments.

1

I will be addressing this:

Is there a smart way to approach this problem? The only thing I can think of is to get a fresh server and try to get the site running there documenting all the steps. Then handing the image and steps to IT people and hoping that what worked in one environment is going to work on a different environment!

Having managed large-scale production environments and development environments, I will give you the following advice.

The only thing I can think of is to get a fresh server and try to get the site running there documenting all the steps.

You should have a working copy of the system within the development environment so that you are intimately aware of what needs to happen from the development perspective. Detail the snot out of this! Make sure every tiny detail is documented as you go along. It will pay dividends!!

Then handing the image and steps to IT people and hoping that what worked in one environment is going to work on a different environment!

Absolutely not! You want a build for your work and not the entire server. You are not the expert and cannot mitigate security and operational issues. You do want to create build instructions and supply installs and other build material, but only for what you are introducing into the environment and not server level stuff. The reason for this is simple. If you supply it, you are responsible for it. Any production environment should never allow development to dictate the OS and supply an image. In fact, most will not even let you supply the application installs and will prefer to check this out for themselves to ensure that the latest and safest version of any application is installed. In some environments, some applications are not allowed at all and that should be taken into account as well. It all depends on how tightly controlled and well managed your production environment is.

| improve this answer | |
  • That was handing the image of what to be deployed not image of a server to deploy! – jimjim Apr 29 '15 at 5:22
  • @Arjang I stand corrected. Still, having been on both sides of the fence for a global telecom that everyone will recognize, I say keep it as simple as possible. In the production world, we referred to images as current deployable images of builds for web servers, database servers, e-mail servers, etc. We used to image the system then change the drivers if required for the specific hardware if it differs. On the development side, it was best to have written step-by-step instructions and installs and data files and so forth so that anyone could install your work. Make it idiot proof!! – closetnoc Apr 29 '15 at 5:28
  • I would love to keep it as simple as possible, but I am working on top of what many others have developed, I am changing only a fraction of what was working and don't know about all other nuances that the developers before me went through to get it all working. I was hoping to extract that information directly from the server and not hear it from people that some folder that I had nothing to do with, now needs to have permissions set on it for the file uploads to work! – jimjim Apr 29 '15 at 5:36
  • 1
    @Arjang You need information. That is clear. Meanwhile, production should never let non-production personnel touch the servers. That is standard practice. But there has to be a better way that the two of you can get together. Having been in an extremely large-scale production environment, I would have sat with you and tried to work with you looking over my shoulder to answer all of your questions so that you can do your work. It is better for the production crew to do this- no question. It may be that management needs to make this happen. It would be a shame if it comes to that. – closetnoc Apr 29 '15 at 5:45
  • @Arjang I understand that development and production see themselves as two sides of the same fence. But the reality is that the work has to get done for the sake of the company and no-one wants the be the broken cog in the machine. So it really is in the best interest that both halves come together sometimes working for the common goal. This was my philosophy when I managed both environments. Both had to work together. In the end, we were more professional and efficient doing so. We better understood what each needed and was proactive in considering the requirements to getting the work done. – closetnoc Apr 29 '15 at 5:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.