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My website is hosted on hostgator and i have purchased their ssl service.

Now when i open my website in chrome then it works fine but when i open it in firefox it gives me error like

The certificate is not trusted because no issuer chain was provided.

So how to add this issue chain in ssl certificate?

  • Before investigating this further, first try disabling security software such as ESET or BitDefender, as covered on the Mozilla Support website here. You can also inspect your SSL certificate on sites like this one. – dan Jan 31 '15 at 8:11
  • i am in linux. I do not have any such security software. – Jeegar Patel Jan 31 '15 at 8:15
  • OK, it wasn't clear what your OS was, and that's the suggestion on Mozilla's Support site. I'd suggest checking your SSL in the second link, as suggested here. Checking Firefox on another computer, like one with Windows might also be wise. If the tests still shows there's an issue, please add some more details about your SSL and your server, since it would be difficult for users to specifically answer this otherwise. – dan Jan 31 '15 at 8:19
  • Other people have had similar problems: SSL site and browser warning -- SSL Certificate Error – Stephen Ostermiller Jan 31 '15 at 12:43
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It means that the server doesn't provide the intermediate certificate used to sign your certificate. Normally, certificate authority have their own root certificate, known to browsers and operating systems, which they use to sign an intermediate certificate that in turn directly signs your certificate.

You need to include that intermediate certificate in your server's response. For nginx and newer Apache releases, you just cat your certificate and the intermediate certificate together. With a hosted service, complain to the provider.

  • Yes issue is due to this intermediate CA ...woking with provider to solve this – Jeegar Patel Feb 1 '15 at 7:44

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