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I have searched a lot to find the difference between "Entry Processes" and the "Total Allowed Processes"...

Here is the problem: I found a shared web hosting provider that says that the number of processes allowed is 30, while the number of "Entry Processes" allowed is 20. Their web hosting rules can be found here.

So what is the difference between number of "Entry Processes" and number of total processes? Does that mean that the website hosted by them can handle only 30 process per day...so only 30 users can visit a website hosted by them each day?

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    These are LVE terms commonly found with CloudLinux. Entry processes (EP) are single sockets assigned to a connection, and allowed processes (PROC) are threads within those EP's. Usually 1 EP is equal to 2-3 PROC. Lets say you had a huge script, say it took 10 seconds to execute. The script would hold an EP for the execute duration and possibly request more worker PROC. So if 20 people connected to execute the script in that 10 second span, your server would fault and cause 500/508 error to the 21st person. They would be awaiting a free EP socket until one of those scripts finished up. – dhaupin Jan 13 '15 at 21:53
  • but if each 1 ep equal to 3 proc doesn't that means that if 10 users called that script in that same 10 seconds the server will fault for the 11th user since 10epx3pdoc equal to 30 proc? – Saaid Samer Jan 13 '15 at 22:07
  • Seems @dhaupin can provide a good explanation for this (and might cite this CloudLinux doc). – dan Jan 13 '15 at 22:56
  • @Saaid Samer yes you hit the nail on the head. You can cap from proc too although in my experience it's much harder until you go into the compute/scientific realms. Always remember too: protect your controllers... Its somewhat easy to DDoS functions based on EP... if you find the routes. – dhaupin Jan 14 '15 at 0:40
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    Haha I see this is back open, I'll make an answer I suppose too (when I'm not mobile) – dhaupin Jan 14 '15 at 0:53
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EP -- counts apache connections to dynamic scripts, cron jobs and ssh sessions

NPROC - number of processes

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