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I have an established blog that has been putting out content for a year.

Today I noticed that somebody has cloned my entire website, word-for-word, and hosted it on a separate domain. When I say cloned, I mean you could put them side-by-side and they would look identical, so everything has been copied, including content, layout, etc. I looked at the source and the HTML has been copied verbatim. The new domain has only been registered a few weeks ago.

Unfortunately the copied site is now outranking my real site on a few keywords in google search results! On some keywords the fake site has taken my place on the first page of the search results, and my site is no longer even listed!

What can I do about this?

Update: I filed a DCMA complaint with Google.

Update: I just discovered that he is just using his site as a proxy to access mine. I can block his IP from accessing my site which would effectively solve the problem (maybe only temporarily?), but then what happens when Google investigates the DCMA and finds nothing?

marked as duplicate by dan Jun 30 '14 at 3:36

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  • If you are in the U.S., you can file federal copyright charge immediately regardless of where the site is located. I would hire a lawyer. Some will do this on a fee if win basis. Otherwise, File a DCMA complaint at least through Google: google.com/webmasters/tools/dmca-dashboard but you would need an account. The complaint will not only effect Google, but also those who participate in ChillingEffects. I would do this today if you can. – closetnoc Jun 29 '14 at 20:20
  • @closetnoc I'm not in the US, but I have already filed a DCMA complaint on that URL, thanks. – CaptainCodeman Jun 29 '14 at 20:49
  • By the way, I discovered that he is just using his site as a proxy to access mine. I can block his IP from accessing my site which would effectively solve the problem, but then what happens when Google investigates the DCMA and finds nothing? – CaptainCodeman Jun 29 '14 at 20:51
  • In this case, I am not sure a DCMA complaint is right just yet- but still an option/idea. Are you able to determine an IP address?? How about the sites domain name? – closetnoc Jun 29 '14 at 20:54
  • Yes, I found out the site's IP address, as I noticed the error pages were the same as mine so I suspected he was just redirecting all requests to my server, and I was right. I sent a request for a page that doesn't exist, and found the request in my logs. – CaptainCodeman Jun 29 '14 at 21:00

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