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For webpages, like https://example.com, you have standard metadata names like author, description. Is there any equivalence for other URI, like mailto:[email protected]? I know that for an email you can extract the message header field names, but here I ask for email address only.

I have a feeling that the answer is no, because for whatever the protocol is used, the server must respond something to the request. For the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), a HTML page containing <meta> tags are typically responded. But for SMTP, I'm not so sure. I have a feeling that SMTP wasn't created with an intention to send response for any request. Is that correct?

Skimming Uniform Resource Identifier - Wikipedia or Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) - Wikipedia I don't see where this is mentioned.

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    mailto supports subject, cc, bcc, and even body text in the URI. Ex: mailto:[email protected]?subject=This%20is%20an%20email Commented Jun 10 at 16:23
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    As another example, FTP supports username, password, port, and path as optional standard parameters in the URI. Commented Jun 10 at 16:28
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    To the best of my knowledge, a URI is just what you use to get to a particular resource, so the expected response is defined by the protocol; it's not really a URI thing. The way I would put it, different protocols define (and lay claim to) different URIs. Commented Jun 11 at 5:35
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    That analogy sounds right to me, yes. A URI is like an address or a phone number, it's just an identifier (and indeed telephone numbers are supported under the URI spec - that's why you can make telephone numbers into web hyperlinks that open a dialer on a smartphone). A protocol is more like the details of how mail is routed and delivered, or how a phone call actually reaches your handset and gets translated from a data stream into sound. Commented Jun 12 at 1:30
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    No, there's no way to return a text response for that. No web server or HTTP is involved after you click the mailto link (assuming you've got a native email client and not a web email client). The browser knows it can't speak the protocol referred to by the URI, so it switches to a different piece of software that it knows can speak that protocol. Commented Jun 12 at 5:36

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