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Here is my scenario. I have WebPage A it is published on my domain. I publish the same content on another site, this is WebPage B. I've added a canonical URL on WebPage B so that it shows to WebPage A.

There is a site that has published my content, let's call it WebPage C, but they didn't set a canonical URL (they say that their CMS doesn't have that option).

WebPage A (and therefore WebPage B and WebPage C) has a link at the end of the page that says, "For more details on exclusive monthly offers, check Calendar".

Do all of the links from pages A, B, and C to calendar page bring the same value to the calendar page?

Does the internal link from WebPageA to Calendar has the same "weight" as the link from WebPage B (that has a canonical URL) and WebPage C (that hasn't got a canonical URL)?

I guess that external links are more valuable than internal ones. Am I right? But what if the external page is a duplicate of the page on my own site? Does the canonical have any role in it? Are links from pages with canonical URLs "valuable" when it comes to ranking of the pages?

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Do all of the links from pages A, B, and C to calendar page bring the same value to the calendar page?

If the pages are canonicalized, only one link will count. Important: just because A published first and B has a canonical tag pointing to A, does not mean Google will pick A as the canonical version. It could be either of the 3. Or Google might not canonicalize at all.

Does the internal link from WebPageA to Calendar has the same "weight" as the link from WebPage B (that has a canonical URL) and WebPage C (that hasn't got a canonical URL)?

Why is this relevant? Even if you were to re-engineer this now, you would not know if Google would behave the same next week or next month.

The answer will depend on a) webpages A, B, and C and b) on how Google decided to canonicalize these pages.

If A is CNN and B and C are tiny blogs, an internal link from A to the calendar will be more relevant than an external link from B and C.

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    Thank you, Malte! I didn't know that there was a possibility that Google could choose some other version than page A to include.
    – KWriter
    Commented Dec 10, 2022 at 11:27
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    Canonical is a hint. Google might ignore or overrule it. If all the involved pages are on the same domain, Google will tell you in Google Search Console when they picked a canonical version even though there was no canonical tag, when they picked a different version than you indicated via canonical tag, etc. Commented Dec 11, 2022 at 8:01
  • Good to know. Can you recommend me some good resources about canonical URLs and when to use them, and when to avoid them?
    – KWriter
    Commented Dec 11, 2022 at 9:34
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    I would always use a canonical when it is appropriate. This includes a self-referencing canonical. Just keep in mind that the canonical is a hint that Google might ignore. If you can use a redirect instead of a canonical, use a redirect. Commented Dec 22, 2022 at 6:54

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