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It's prevalent to have sections like features, or recent posts or our skills on a website's home page and these sections have short explanations and then usually have a Read More link:

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This image belongs to Template Monster.

As you can see, three blog posts are shown and each has enough context the user never gets confused by what Read More really means in this context.

However, using pagespeed.web.dev it complains that we should fix this.

Adding descriptive text to these links literally makes them worse.

What solutions are there for this problem? How can we make sure that search engines are happy, and also keep texts clean and tidy on websites?

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PageSpeed suggests using descriptive text for links because search engines use anchor text pointing to pages to help determine what the page is about. That being said:

  • If the context around the link only contains text that will be found on the page itself, using anchor text probably won't add much of anything
  • Google doesn't seem to use internal anchor text for this purpose very much. Google seems to mostly rely on external anchor text to know more about pages.

In the end, the advice from PageSpeed is only suggestions. You don't have to implement every last thing it finds. If you have reason to believe the advice will make your site worse, you don't have to take it.

There are also usability arguments around "Read more:"

The easiest way to fix this problem both from a search engine crawler and usability perspective would be to make the article title and summary part of the "read more" link. You could use CSS to style it so that everything appears just as it is now, but possibly with a hover effect that shows that the whole thing is clickable, or an underline under the title to indicate that it is a link.

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