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I roughly understand the idea of warming up an IP address used to send emails, and accept that any answer will be somewhat subjective, but can anyone cast any light on the following as I don't have much knowledge about the relevance of volumes -

I have a mail server that typically sends out between 800 and 1600 messages per day. Very few of these messages would be newsletters or the like - most of it is person-to-person communication - although there will unfortunately be some "web form spam" - ie email going from web forms back to the person at the company in charge of them which have been filled out by spammers - and these may not have adequate anti-spam/CAPTCHA protection - still - most emails are legitimate from real people to real people. Likewise, email trickles through throughout the day, rather then being sent in bursts.

With these relatively low volumes, do I still need to warm up the server - and if so how quickly?

Relatedly, if I get it sending about 50% of the email and suddenly need to promote it to only primary server, is doubling the amount of email it sends once warm likely to be problematic? (As its in a different data center, I can't do IP address takeover if the main server goes down for an extended period )

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  • Partial answer - For the most part it seems that the majority of servers had no issues related to taking up 1/3 to 1/2 my volume pretty much immediately. icloud.com was the exception and is complaining about excessive volume.
    – davidgo
    Aug 23, 2022 at 8:11

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