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I have a website that offers different languages as well as pages suited for users in different regions.

Imagine the following 4 pages:

All of them contain hreflang links like this:

<link rel="alternate" hreflang="x-default" href="https://www.example.com/international/en/our-products/"/>
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en" href="https://www.example.com/international/en/our-products/"/>
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-US" href="https://www.example.com/us/en/our-products/"/>
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-FR" href="https://www.example.com/fr/en/our-products/"/>
<link rel="alternate" hreflang="fr-FR" href="https://www.example.com/fr/fr/nos-produits/"/>

I think hreflang works fine for us.

Now to canonicals: The pages for en, en-US and en-FR are largely identical. Do I need canonicals to resolve that duplicate content? Should each of those pages declare itself as canonical or would they point to a single version as canonical?

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The pages for en, en-US and en-FR are largely identical.

They might be very similar, but they are different pages representing different locales. Any one is not the canonical of the other.

Do I need canonicals to resolve that duplicate content?

No, not between the locales, as defined by the hreflang attribute. However, you should still specify a canonical tag for the same reasons you would include a canonical on any page... to resolve any issues where the exact same page (ie. the same locale in this instance) happens to be accessible from different URLs. eg. If a query string got appended, you may not want that to affect the canonical.

Should each of those pages declare itself as canonical

Yes.

...or would they point to a single version as canonical?

No, that would conflict with the hreflang attribute.

Reference:

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