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I'm looking to migrate from ionos to godaddy or similar. Referencing:

https://www.ionos.com/help/domains/set-up-and-manage-an-external-domain-at-11-ionos/removing-an-external-domain/

and, presumably, registering the domain with godaddy is simple enough. How do I ensure that everything is kept intact in terms of the domain registration?

I see:

Authorization Code

The transfer lock is enabled for this domain. For this reason, any transfer request will be declined automatically.
The Private Registration is enabled for this domain. Before you can transfer the domain, you have to deactivate it. 

If you want to transfer your domain to another provider, you will require the authorisation code shown below. The authorisation code makes sure that only the Registrant or Administrator of the domain can initiate the transfer process to a new provider.

Please note that upon completion of a transfer to a new provider, all website content, email addresses and subdomains associated to the domain will be permanently deleted. Your authorization code:

However, wouldn't want to disable an privacy around the domain registration.

Does this disable the privacy information available through whois or similar services?

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    FWIW, unless you are really not wanting to be associated with a domain, briefly disabling privacy some time after registration is generally not an issue. If it is just to get the EPP code, disable privacy, send the code, click the approval link emailed to you (if there is one), then enable again. A domain will transfer with privacy is enabled. When a domain is first registered, without privacy, there is a bunch of spam emails and phone calls - I forgot to add privacy to a new domain this week :o( But down the track, spammers are unlikely to pick up on the fact that privacy has been disabled.
    – Steve
    Jul 14 at 22:36
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Per ICANN requirements (at least for gTLDs, you do not say anything about the relevant domain), registrars have to normally send FOAs by email to current contacts to make sure they agree with the transfer (this is on top of having the proper "authcode" and not having the EPP clientTransferProhibited status on the domain).

Registrars find the contacts using whois, so obviously if real contacts are masked by privacy, this can't happen. But not all registrars do send those FOAs anymore, since GDPR arrived ICANN had to put in place a temporary policy that basically allows to bypass that.

But in short it depends a lot on the new (gaining) registrar so the correct move is to ask it for help on transferring your domain to it.

Also, technically, a domain name transfer between registrar does not change contacts, or nameservers (again, generic rules, exceptions exist in some TLDs). But, as soon as the transfer is finished the new registrar can obviously update contacts (including applying any sort of privacy service it provides) or nameservers or statuses, etc.

So, depending on the registrar, you may have to choose "new" contacts during the transfer path, and the registrar will apply the new data once the transfer is finished. Again, depends on the registrar, so you have to ask it or find its relevant documentation. Many registrars provide a "transfer concierge" service or something like that, sometimes tied to specific conditions like size of portfolio, but that means you may have a human help to do the transfer or even someone doing it on your behalf once you give the authcode.

As for:

Does this disable the privacy information available through whois or similar services?

Based on the line:

The Private Registration is enabled for this domain. Before you can transfer the domain, you have to deactivate it.

it really means yes, you have to remove privacy for reasons given above: sending potentially email to proper contacts.

PS: the Ionos link you gave has nothing to do with registrar transfers.

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