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I have written some simple js/php that adds WordPress taxonomies and categories of posts to the urls of blog posts so that we can search in google analytics which posts with matching taxonomies are performing better.

Before I put this live though I would like to know how and if this will effect ranking of those posts. I have tried online but so far i am struggling to find an answer.

example of the URL pre and post URL params

  • https://example.com/collaboration/how-to-activate-teams-together-mode/
  • https://example.com/collaboration/how-to-activate-teams-together-mode/?cat=Team%20Collaboration&brands=Microsoft&region=EMEAAmericasAPAC

Added information thanks to Stephen : The parameters are always consistent. I am doing a pushState refresh to add the url parameters so the page refreshes with the parameters. The posts will always have the parameters. The canonical tag is the original url.

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  • Are the parameters always consistent? In other words, does the same page ever have two different sets of parameters? Are you redirecting the version without parameters to the version with parameters? Are you changing the site to always link to the version with parameters? Are you using canonical tags, if so, do they have the parameters? Feb 16, 2021 at 12:34
  • Yes the parameters are always consistent. I am doing a pushState refresh to add the url parameters so the page refreshes with the parameters. Yes the posts will always have the parameters. The canonical tag is the original url does this need to be updated? Thanks Stephen
    – Sam Smith
    Feb 16, 2021 at 12:44
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    Just an idea, you could pass that information to GA as custom dimensions and not mess up your URLs. Feb 16, 2021 at 15:07
  • I will have to look into that as a solution thankyou.
    – Sam Smith
    Feb 16, 2021 at 17:02

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To answer your question, no it won't. As long as the page rendered from that URL is consistent. Google's URL index directs users to relevant results for their search.

If Google can index your URL, regardless of what it is, and send the user to a page with the information they are looking for, you have achieved what they need for their algorithm in my 'humble' opinion.

Using a canonical tag, will override anything they see as unnecessary and strengthen SEO on these pages.

The main components of good SEO are:

  1. A clear URL, with keywords in the URL
  2. A related title tag with the same keywords
  3. A clear description, using these same keywords
  4. On-page content relating to and including these keywords

One used to be able to spoof search engines with highly searched keywords, but Google has stopped that and penalizes your site now. Always try to rank as an authoritative result for a respective keyword or phrase, giving USERS relevant and useful information.

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