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I'm trying to change the image shown in a website's SERP, when using Google. I installed the JSON-LD Knowledge Graph application script already.

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
      "@context": "https://schema.org",
      "@type": "ImageObject",
      "author": "Georges Jean-Denis",
      "contentLocation": "Montreal Quebec, Canada",
      "contentUrl": "https://lushyne.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/slider_lushyne_1.jpg",
      "datePublished": "2021-02-15",
      "description": "MAIN WEBSITE PICTURE ...",
      "name": "MAIN PICTURE"
}
</script>

I get this image when I do this Google search for "lushyne" or click on any of the following links.

luchyne search results showing incorrect map

But that is not Lushyne from my website. It is Lushyne, a city in Ukraine. Google tells me so (caption: Map data ©2021 Google.)

That does not work for me. What would you do to make this work? Do I need to do something with the Google Search Console?

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1 Answer 1

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API Google Knowledge Graph scrapes structured data which in turn for images Google supports for the following types:

It is not clear from your question what type your image is. You can use these Google guidelines for your images:

To non-amp: For best results, provide multiple high-resolution images (minimum of 300,000 pixels when multiplying width and height) with the following aspect ratios: 16x9, 4x3, and 1x1.

To amp: For best results, provide multiple high-resolution images (minimum of 800,000 pixels when multiplying width and height) with the following aspect ratios: 16x9, 4x3, and 1x1.

There is also an example there:

    {
  "@context": "https://schema.org",
  "@type": "NewsArticle",
  "image": [
    "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg",
    "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg",
    "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg"
  ]
}

In addition, even if there is structured data consistent with Google's guide, they do not undertake to use this data in a rich result. Check out the following Google statement about structured data:

Important: Google does not guarantee that your structured data will show up in search results, even if your page is marked up correctly according to the Rich Results Test. Here are some common reasons why:

Using structured data enables a feature to be present, it does not guarantee that it will be present. The Google algorithm tailors search results to create what it thinks is the best search experience for a user, depending on many variables, including search history, location, and device type. In some cases it may determine that one feature is more appropriate than another, or even that a plain blue link is best. The structured data is not representative of the main content of the page, or is potentially misleading. The structured data is incorrect in a way that the Rich Results Test was not able to catch. The content referred to by the structured data is hidden from the user. The page does not meet the guidelines for structured data described here, the type-specific guidelines, or the general webmaster guidelines.

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