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According to Google Search Console for a website I am working on, Googlebot crawls ~5000 pages per day (min 2500, max 8500).

However, when looking at the Apache log files, GoogleBot only shows up ~10 times per day ...

For example:

66.249.64.88    [22/Jan/2020:15:09:01   +0100]  [22/Jan/2020:15:09:01 +0100]    GET / HTTP/1.1  200 1358    Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Googlebot/2.1; +http://www.google.com/bot.html)

It is GoogleBot since doing a reverse dns does point to Google servers:

$ host 66.249.64.88
88.64.249.66.in-addr.arpa domain name pointer crawl-66-249-64-88.googlebot.com 

But I am wondering : If GoogleBot appears only 10 times in Apache log files while it crawls 5000 pages per day, where are the remaining 4990 crawls going?

How can I know which resource GoogleBot crawls when it does not appear in the log files ?

Thanks!

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The value Google is showing (~5000) it's how much they "set aside" to crawl your website, based on what they think it'll be needed - it doesn't mean they will use it or even that there's a need for this much.

If your website isn't large and/or doesn't get to much organic traffic, having 10 visits per day isn't unheard-of.

Look into which pages are being visited instead; if important pages are not getting crawled then, yes, you have a problem.

| improve this answer | |
  • Well yes I think there is a problem: 90% of GoogleBot entries show a 404 when trying to access the robots.txt. However, the robots.txt is directly accessible from root and it does return a 200, I checked with curl --head ... And apart from the homepage, Googlebot accesses very few other pages / resources in 2 weeks, like 2 or 3 product pages ... – Antoine Brunel Feb 2 at 12:36
  • Yeah, it does look like you are having some issues - depending on the size of your website, it can be some sort of "crawler trap": searchenginejournal.com/… – Andre Guelmann Feb 2 at 14:28

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