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In the Google Search Console I have a lot of "Alternate page with proper canonical tag" (34k for 46k valid pages) with these weird fragment identifier parameters:

https://example.com/somepage#!&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwiC2ajdlfTKAhUIUBQKHUbKAb4QwW4INDAP&usg=AFQjCNFmuH2B1N0_0ykScXJwPz1xmEi1mA

The parameters sa, ved and usg seem to be used by google for its tracking, I am not using this kind of query string parameters at all in my application.

These URL have the right "canonical URL declared by user" (https://example.com/somepage for this example) but I'd like to know where this can come from, is it due to Google Analytics or something like this? Can I avoid this?

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    "I am not using this kind of query string parameters" - these aren't part of the "query string" (although they would have been part of the referring query string in yesteryears Google), they form part of the fragment identifier in this instance - which can only be processed by client-side JavaScript. The format #! (hash bang) is typical of legacy AJAX applications (a Google specification, now deprecated). – MrWhite Jan 3 at 21:26
  • Oh right, I didn't know about the hash-bang thing. If I understand correctly it was used to allow the crawler to see the pages with content loaded via AJAX, ok. Thank you for your lights ;) The fact is that I do not use any hashbang in my application (which is an Angular app rendered by Angular Universal), do you have any clue on where these links can come from? – Quentin V. Jan 6 at 10:33
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    The URLs look a little different, but the answer is the same as for Why are bots repeatedly crawling pages of my site that I never created?. – Stephen Ostermiller Jan 6 at 11:25

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