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Our web dev agency is working with a design agency to build a website for a client. I want to make it clear to google that our client owns the site, but that we and the design agency made it. So far here is what I have:

<script type="application/ld+json">{
    "@type":"Organization",
    "name":"Our Client",
    "@id":"/#Organization",
    "details":"checked against google structured data testing tool",
    "@context":"https://schema.org"
}</script><script type="application/ld+json">{
    "@type":"WebSite",
    "@id":"/#WebSite",
    "details":"checked against google structured data testing tool",
    "sourceOrganization":{
        "@id":"/#Organization"
    },
    "creator":[
        {
            "@type":"Organization",
            "name":"Web Dev Agency",
            "@id":"web-dev-agency.com/#Organization"
        },
        {
            "@type":"Organization",
            "name":"Design Studio",
            "@id":"design-studio.com/#Organization"
        }
    ],
    "@context":"https://schema.org"
}</script>

and then objects on the page are linked by isPartOf to a WebPage, which similarly links to the WebSite itself.

First off, does this make sense? I'm still figuring out structured data and haven't been able to find examples of this particular use case, but the structured data testing tool is giving me the OK.

Is there a better way to show that our client owns the website and is responsible for its day to day running? I've also considered the Producer and Publisher types, but nothing feels quite right for this relationship.

I'd like to credit individual designers and developers - would it be better to have the website creator objects as Persons, pointing to unique @ids, or have them as members of the creator organisations as they stand?

  • Why do you think structured data will help? As far as I know, Google hasn't said they pay attention website creator structure data or use it for any particular purpose. – Stephen Ostermiller Dec 20 '19 at 16:10
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Although you and your team are building the site, the client is buying it, which means if you want to put any sort of credit on their website (even Schema code) you really should ask their permission.

As Stephen mentioned it's unlikely that this data will be used for anything, so it would probably be better to instead ask the client if they would mind being featured on your website, and just place them visibly in your portfolio. That will signal to both search engines and visitors that you made the client's site, without cluttering it.

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First off, does this make sense?

Not really. Nobody would have a profit from this. Website code and design are not such kind of copyrightable product (not a scientific whitepaper, not a patent, not a book with ISBN), about which one should inform Google.

Is there a better way to show that our client owns the website and is responsible for its day to day running?

Sure. If your client will be really proud about your work, he will publish a link from his site to your site, like "code by ... / design by ...". And it will much more worth, than any other kind of mention. For Google and for human visitors.

I'd like to credit individual designers and developers

Then create a page for the developers team and beg your client to link this page.

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