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I have two servers which have different IPs and locations (but the same data). I want to set single domain DNS for them and when client send request to domain, DNS server offers nearest server due to latency or defined source IPs.

  • That isn't standard functionality in most DNS servers. I know that content delivery networks implement DNS servers that do what you want but I'm not sure what is available to you. – Stephen Ostermiller Jan 5 '19 at 11:15
  • There are DNS providers that offer this sort of service but it will cost money. Search for "dns traffic management" or similar terms. – Tim Fountain Jan 5 '19 at 11:31
  • Related tutorial: labs.ripe.net/Members/samir_jafferali/… – Maximillian Laumeister Jan 5 '19 at 17:57
  • The DIY route is quite involved afaik, you will probably just want to find a DNS provider that provides anycast routing as a service. – Maximillian Laumeister Jan 5 '19 at 17:58
  • Have a look at EDNS Client Subnet option which is a standard and available in multiple nameserver implementation. That will cater for the second part "defined source IPs". To do answer based on (dynaic) latency, that will be more complicated. – Patrick Mevzek Jan 6 '19 at 21:12
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What you are looking for is DNS traffic management. This is a quite extensive and complicated situation in that you will most likely want to route the connection to the server with the lowest latency (closed by network) rather than the physically closest server. A wide number of DNS hosting providers offer traffic management on their DNS services but as these are complicated premium services they are priced accordingly. Without extensive experience in DNS, network management, and in the absence of the necessary infrastructure to support DNS traffic management it would be more economic to use one of these manged DNS services to handle the heavy lifting for you.

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