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Mainly a niggling query when reading Guardian articles. Would anyone have any insight on why they would add in a seemingly random category link to an article, and why it would be chosen?

For example, in this article 'prostate cancer' is linked to https://www.theguardian.com/society/prostate-cancer. Where I'd imagine that for internal link building (which I guess is what they are doing) it would be more beneficial to link to the AI category.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jul/04/its-going-create-revolution-how-ai-transforming-nhs

It's not the first time I've seen this, just wondered if there was a beneficial reason for doing it?

  • Sorry but this question is considered off-topic because: Web sites out of your control -- If the question is about another site (such as Gmail or Facebook) and not about your own website, it is off-topic here. – Simon Hayter Jul 4 '18 at 11:12
  • Sorry, first time I've seen that page. I'll review that before posting any more queries. Apologies for wasting your time. – alexmcfarlane Jul 4 '18 at 11:15
  • @Simon I don’t see why this is off-topic. Isn’t the rule about other sites to prevent asking how to use other websites? This question is asking whether there is SEO benefit to doing what the Guardian is doing. – DisgruntledGoat Jul 4 '18 at 14:26
  • @DisgruntledGoat I like theoretical questions from webmasters that point to other sites for inspiration or example. Where it falls apart for me is when it is not clear whether an OP is a webmaster or a user of the site. Still, I like curiosity. – closetnoc Jul 4 '18 at 18:45
  • @DisgruntledGoat Web sites out of your control -- If the question is about another site (such as Gmail or Facebook) and not about your own website, it is off-topic here. <-- from help centre. Furthermore why one website takes one approach is opinionated. – Simon Hayter Jul 4 '18 at 22:36

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