3

As far as I know, two links with the same URL don't hurt SEO, Google will only see and consider the first one, and SEO benefits will be passed only to this.

But what about, if I have two links, one with image and another with text (usual in article listing), which of these will be considered for SEO?

For example:

<a href="http://www.example.com/article1">
  <img src="imgurl" alt="MyAwesomeArticle"/>
</a>

<a href="http://www.example.com/article1">MyAwesomeArticle</a>

In this case, will be considered only the first one? (that of course, will be bad for SEO, because anchor text is better than alt attribute.) Or Google (and others) will be smart enough to pick the link with the highest value (the one with the anchor text)?

… or something like this will be better?

<a href="http://www.example.com/article1">
  <img src="imgurl" alt="MyAwesomeArticle"/>
  <span>MyAwesomeArticle</span>
</a>
  • i think, it's useless .. better you 2 different links, so that crawler more effective. thank you – Hendra Surya Jul 1 '18 at 13:12
2

It's common for same links to appear multiple times on a page and both Google and Bing have never penalised for it.

This is correct!

<!-- EXAMPLE #1 -->
<div class="container">
    <h2>
        <a href="#">Header Title</a>
    </h2>
    <a href="#">
        <img src="example.jpg" alt="example">
        <span>An example of some text</span>
    </a>
</div>

This is correct too!

<!-- EXAMPLE #2 -->
<a href="#">
    <h2>Header Title</h2>
    <img src="example.jpg" alt="example">
    <span>An example of some text</span>
</a> 

Both examples are treated the same by all search engines, so from SEO POV both are the same. Far a technical point of view, the least amount of code is normally a better practice to reduce page size.

  • Thanks, but as I know Google pass seo benefits only to the first one (Matt Cutts said in 2009 ). In this case, which will be chosen? – CDNxL Jul 1 '18 at 17:28
  • 1
    @CDRocket Be careful! 1. Matt Cutts should not always be quoted or taken too seriously. 2. That was almost a decade ago. Do not pay attention to anything more than a few years in age. – closetnoc Jul 1 '18 at 18:39
  • 1
    only to the first one, rubbish. Internally they are treated the same. Externally, the 2nd one is ignored or spread across therefore it doesn't matter. – Simon Hayter Jul 1 '18 at 20:45
  • 1
    Also... HTML5 turned to as recommendation on the 28th October 2014... 5 years later that what Matt Cutts said that, why is this important? because before it was not valid to stick many elements within the <a href="">, I highly recommend you stop reading everything pre-2015 since a lot has changed. – Simon Hayter Jul 1 '18 at 20:48
0

It was tested here and the conclusion was that the first link count rule doesn't apply to the image links (with alt). More exclusions related to first link count rule are mentioned here.

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