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For example, take stackexchange.com, and imagine that at the end of each url, no matter what the page is about, we’ll have two more keyowrds at the end.

For example: stackexchange,com/questions/108587/missing-google-analytics-accounts-from-ga-ios-app-keyword1-keyword2

These keywords will be related to the website as a whole. Is it a good practice? Do you think I can get penalized?

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    Is it a good practice? No. Search is not about keywords, it is about whole language. Your URL should accurately reflect what the page is about and be as semantically complete as makes sense, in other words, it should almost read like a sentence. Semantics is how it will be evaluated. Creating a URL that is not semantically clear only hurts your ability to be found in search. – closetnoc Aug 12 '17 at 17:55
  • I still think that using keywords in the right places is good SEO practice, however, keywords in the URL don't help rankings now. Descriptive words in the URL help users who see a URL know what the page is going to be about. That is good for user experience. Adding the same words to every URL on your site isn't going to help SEO and it is going to make the user experience worse. – Stephen Ostermiller Aug 13 '17 at 8:59
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For example: stackexchange,com/questions/108587/missing-google-analytics-accounts-from-ga-ios-app-keyword1-keyword2

These keywords will be related to the website as a whole. Is it a good practice? Do you think I can get penalized? Thanks.

Some search engines won't like that you're using "keyword stuffing" to try to rank high. For this reason, don't get too carried away with keywords. In fact, try avoiding the same word twice in the URL.

Rather than use dozens of keywords, use a format that is short and that makes sense, and that is friendly with many browsers. I think Microsoft Internet Explorer has a limit of 2048 characters for a URL (or was that apache, I forget). But nevertheless, keep URLs short and sweet so they are easy to remember.

So what stackexchange did was create a major category called questions then in that category, created some ID number as a category, and in that created the question itself. Therefore the URL may be the following:

stackexchange.com/questions/108587/missing-google-analytics-accounts-from-ga-ios-app

But using this URL will make users wonder if the site make sense:

stackexchange.com/questions-missing-google-analytics-accounts-from-ga-ios-app-answer-page-here

If it were my site, I'd break it down into categories all the more:

stackexchange.com/questions/google/analytics/missing-account

The above example would suggest that I'm accessing a page about a question regarding missing accounts found under analytics which is found under google.

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