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We have a contact form with an email address field.

Let's say user@yahoo.com will send an email using our contact form.

When it's submitted this is what the headers would look like:

From: "user@yahoo.com" <noreply@ourdomain.com>
Reply-To: user@yahoo.com

This seems to pass SPF, DKIM, DMARC, which is my goal.

My concern is, this somewhat spoofs the From Name and From Email. Is this an acceptable practice?

  • Why are you adding the noreply@ part of the header? Why not just make it be from user@yahoo.com? – Steve May 17 '17 at 5:59
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    @Steve that will not pass SPF, DKIM, DMARC as that implies that the message was sent from @yahoo.com even if it's technically not because the real server where the message is coming from is from @ourdomain.com – IMB May 17 '17 at 7:30
  • If at all possible you should use the domain name to respond to anything coming in through your contact form. That is the professional and legitimate way to do it. – Michael Moriarty May 20 '17 at 6:03
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    @MichaelMoriarty True but that's not really the issue here. – IMB May 22 '17 at 17:13
  • Question was, "My concern is, this somewhat spoofs the From Name and From Email. Is this an acceptable practice?" Answer: "No, it is not acceptable practice." – Michael Moriarty Jun 27 '17 at 3:33
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Yes, that's an acceptable practice. You could also append the users name and e-mail to the subject line or content if you want that information to be more visible to the recipient.

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