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Not sure if I'm asking in the right section, I usually hang around stackoverflow.

I have a website that gets between 10-30 new articles a day written by our team. We like to automate as much as possible and have the building capacity to do so.

One thing that stands out is people saying pinging pages using pingler or pingomatic is a great for ranking, but there's usage limits to those services, and it's manual..

How does one ping a site or search engine ? The only ping I know of is command line ping.. Is it the same thing?

  • Command line ping is for seeing whether another host is reachable. Pinging search engines is about letting them know about freshly written content. – Stephen Ostermiller May 1 '17 at 22:37
  • @StephenOstermiller Hi Stephen, thanks for looking. So how does the ping command or call differ programatically? The purpose behind them is different, I understand, so do I send a curl command with data, or? I can't seem to google the right keywords to get this answer. – Darius May 1 '17 at 22:39
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    It is a little more difficult than just using curl. You have to put the new URLs into a new sitemap file. You can then use curl to submit the sitemap file: forthedeveloper.com/2008/the-search-for-sitemap-ping-urls Services like pingomatic do all that work for you. – Stephen Ostermiller May 1 '17 at 22:43
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    There's little evidence to support the idea of submitting a sitemap or pinging a page or resource triggers a 'FASTER' return of the Googlebot. – Simon Hayter May 1 '17 at 23:22
  • Thank you for the feedback and keeping me from wasting time on this. – Darius May 2 '17 at 10:21
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Your thinking is a bit on the opposite side, I'll explain based on your questions:

The only ping I know of is command line ping.. Is it the same thing?

The command-line ping checks to see if a domain exists and if it does, an IP address is given.

One thing that stands out is people saying pinging pages using pingler or pingomatic is a great for ranking, but there's usage limits to those services, and it's manual.. How does one ping a site or search engine?

With programming, but if you're trying to actually have your articles ranked high in search engines, pinging them is not exactly the right way to go.

I have a website that gets between 10-30 new articles a day written by our team. We like to automate as much as possible and have the building capacity to do so.

In the old days, a link would have been available where you would submit a sitemap about your site (which basically is a set of files that explain the structure of your pages).

What I recommend you do is sign up for webmaster tools for the search engines you want to rank for. Google and Bing each have their own tools. There are settings in each that allow you to define the crawl rate (the speed in which those search engines check out a webpage on your site automatically to rank them). To help the search engines out, you should submit a sitemap to each one so they can get to know the links much faster than crawling through the homepage to figure out where the links are.

Once you done this, the rest is automatic if you're ok with semi-slow-automatic because as I said, the search engines will crawl your site on a regular basis. In Google Search Console, I think their lowest speed is 1 request every 3 or 5 seconds.

What I tend to do which is what you should do to get your site out there more (especially if you add tons of links at once) is to update your sitemap every time your pages update, because search engines can crawl those files as well just like other pages on your site. If you want this process automatic, then you need to name your sitemap files in a programmatic way. For example, have the same filename for the sitemap index file, then for the individual sitemap files, name them 1.xml, 2.xml, 3.xml, etc instead of jack.xml, john.xml, 123.xml.

This is where you go to learn about sitemaps: https://www.sitemaps.org/index.html

And this is where to go for code to make your sitemap files proper: https://www.sitemaps.org/protocol.html

You'll be interested in the section "Using Sitemap index files (to group multiple sitemap files)" which is about 1/3 way down the page.

  • The only problem is that sitemaps are generally ignored if Google can crawl your site okay. Sitemaps are primarily used for auditing. Where a site map is effective is when the site is extremely large or content is behind a login or pay wall. Instead, do what blogs do. Post links to your new content from your home page. Cheers!! – closetnoc May 2 '17 at 3:59
  • Thank you for the info. We've already implemented what you've mentioned and it's performing well. Just wanted to make sure we're assessing all the possibilities and utilizing everything possible. – Darius May 2 '17 at 10:23

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