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Title is the question. i.e. info@example.com, sales@example.com, or any variation of distribution names to be sent to the a single forwarded email by using a wildcard, i.e. an asterisk *@example.com. It doesn't seem that it is possible, it seems they setup "catch all" for managing hosted exchange email lists.

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    Your question isn't clear. Are you after how to set up a catch-all or are you just wanting to know how to forward the email addresses you create to a single address? – Steve Apr 19 '17 at 22:04
  • I seemed to be overthinking this, the way their example in "catch all" is confusing based on my end goal, which is kind of the inverse of the example. "Catch all" does what i'm looking for, which is letting the domain have all of the distribution lists, i.e. sales@domain.com, info@domain.com, etc, while not have to deal with setting them up individually. – user289394 Apr 19 '17 at 22:44
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    Correct. However be warned...you WILL get spammed to death if you enable catch-all. And do not be tempted to start using random email addresses just because you can. Because when you get spammed to death and decide to shut down the catch-all you are going to lose all those random addresses...trust one who fell for this many years ago and learned the hard way :P – Steve Apr 19 '17 at 23:20
  • I've not used their hosted exchange email, or exchange email at all, so I'm not 100% on this, but I believe that each distribution list you make automatically creates an alias (forwarder) with that name, and Exchange server will bounce or accept external email to that alias based on the selection you make in the setup. However, I'm pretty certain that you don't want the catchall results to be forwarded to everyone an any distribution list. Spam is bad enough without passing it on to every person on the distribution list too. – Gypsy Spellweaver Apr 20 '17 at 6:25
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What you are after here is what is known as catch-all (as has been mentioned in comments). When this is done you can specify the normal mailboxes you want (such as user mailboxes) and the catch-all will handle any emails not already handled by an established mailbox.

Catch all mailboxes are basically a worst case situation for email and should only be used where no other option exists to handle your needs in a more reliable manner. The issues here with catch all mailboxes include...

  • If someone tries to email a user and makes a typo they won't get an error back indicating that they should check the email, instead to the sender it will look like the email went through without an issue which can cause more workload on your end trying to forward an email with a spelling error to the correct mailbox.
  • You will open up your mail service to a significant amount of spam as anyone trying a dictionary attack or brute-force attack to send spam to your mail server will see every single email go through which will fill your server up (basically you will have an unlimited number of email addresses that can be spammed), which can cause issues even with spam filtering in place as a percentage of the spam emails can make it through, and when you are dealing with an infinite number of potential email addresses that can still mean a massive number of spam emails making it through.

Based on your question of forwarding distribution emails to a single email address you would basically take your catch all mailbox and forward all the emails from it to a given mailbox. Having said that unless you are coming up with 50 or more generic addresses then it will be just as easy, and more secure from span, to just create a number of auto forwarder addresses instead of a catch all mailbox. By doing that any emails to invalid addresses will still be bounced back as undeliverable to the original sender but emails to valid generic addresses will be forwarded as per your configuration.

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    Most SMTP servers allow aliases to be created. Instead of a catch all scenario, the OP can just create a user mailbox and assign as many aliases as they want. I have hundreds of aliases. It is no trouble to set up. As well, many of the email addresses the OP is suggesting, I would not set up. Why? Because these addys catch spam all day long. – closetnoc Apr 20 '17 at 3:17
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    @closetnoc Yes, the info@ and sales@, among others, tend to get a lot of span. That's because they are so often used. Many online businesses have decided that they need such addys because it is what customers/clients expect, and keeping customers is more important than reducing the exposure to spam. Filters can help, some, and the sales/public relations team(s) have to deal with the rest. Over time a company can develop reasonably effective custom filters for those addys, since legitimate emails will fit into certain patterns based on the business of the company. – Gypsy Spellweaver Apr 20 '17 at 4:26
  • @GypsySpellweaver Yes. I do realize that. However, you will find that many companies avoid these addresses too. Assuming that the OP is not a company arises from the question. For most sites, it is inadvisable to use these addys unless required, for example, postmaster. Cheers!! – closetnoc Apr 20 '17 at 5:36
  • Oh, yea! postmaster/webmaster is just asking for spam. Admin and owner aren't much better. For those, I like to set forwarders that return error at SMTP time, to make sure they don't have a chance of getting through, even with a catchall enabled. – Gypsy Spellweaver Apr 20 '17 at 5:52
  • @closetnoc Actually, assuming the OP is not a company does not arise from the question. GoDaddy hosted exchange email lists are designed for managing the distribution of emails within an organization: sales@.. distributes to all members of the sales team (as an example). Someone not an organization has very limited use for such distribution lists (all family members maybe, or all my online "friends" perhaps). Enabling the distribution list to also receive email from the public is optional, not required. Sales@ and info@ are external candidates, managers@ is likely an internal only list. – Gypsy Spellweaver Apr 20 '17 at 6:06

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