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Until I saw it with my own eyes, I wouldn't believe it : users reported that in some of their searches, my website's name was appearing in a certain way, changing its meaning.

The website name is RADIOM (all caps), and it's a pun with the radium element because it's an "active" student radio ("radio active", it works much better in french).

Anyway, just bumped into what I feared :

Google search with RADIOM spelled with a capital M in the end

Yes, although this spelling never appears anywhere in the source code of this site, although the Google Search Console correctly shows the correct title, I see, on this result, "RadioM" instead of "RADIOM" (or even "Radiom", that would be fine).

It's misleading because there is absolutely no meaning to have a "Radio M", as "M" would stand for nothing in that case.

How can I tell Google that I would prefer they do not change my website's title ?

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    Radiom is not a term. Radio is. Google is using ontologies trying to understand your domain name. The best it can come up with is radio and M. If, for example, radiom was a strong brand, then the result would be different. Google is doing exactly what it should be doing. You and I are likely to agree that Google should not modify radiom, however, Google finds it preferable to establish meaning for your domain name in it's SERPs which is it's right to do. This is perfectly normal. Creating a strong brand is the only way to defeat this. Cheers!! – closetnoc Apr 9 '17 at 19:21
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    We've had a few similar questions on here. Yours is... "less serious"! Sometimes a company decides to use a deliberate misspelling as their brand name. Google "cleverly" auto-corrects this by default and now no-one can simply Google the brand name! Also, Google often manipulates the title that appears in the SERPs anyway (depending on what the user actually searches for). – MrWhite Apr 9 '17 at 21:10
  • @w3dk Done! Thanks for the suggestion. Cheers Mate!! – closetnoc Apr 10 '17 at 1:56
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Radiom is not a term. Radio is. Google is using n-gram analysis and term ontologies trying to understand your domain name for semantic value. The best it can come up with is radio and M. If, for example, radiom was a strong brand, then the result would be different. Google uses more than one ontology to understand domain names including an ontology of brand names. If a domain name cannot be fully understood using the various ontologies, Google makes a guess. Radio M is a valid and reasonable guess. Matching your domain name to an intentional misspelling of radium cannot be reasonably guessed.

Google is doing exactly what it should be doing. You and I are likely to agree that Google should not modify radiom, however, Google finds it preferable to establish meaning for your domain name in it's SERPs which is it's right to do. This is perfectly normal.

Creating a strong brand is the only way to defeat this.

Also consider what @w3dk alludes to. The search query may be important. Not speaking French makes my analysis limited, however, any search for "radio" should match the domain name in such a way that Google would highlight the term as a result match. So in a very real way, Google is doing a very good thing.

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