3

Using a service such as no-ip links your domain to an IP address. For that to happen a client is installed on the web server using the no-ip username/password details.

So, www.example.com may point to 123.123.123.123. However, obviously being dynamic, www.example.com may suddenly change to 123.123.123.124.

The problem I have is with my domain registrar (Namecheap), when I register private name servers I have to link a domain to a fixed IP address. As it's dynamic, I can't assume www.example.com is always going to point to 123.123.123.123.

How do I get around this problem, without having a static IP provided by my ISP, as that means a business account and with that comes additional costs?

EDIT: I may have used private wrongly. I currently host my own webserver on a VPS, which has a static IP. However, I'd like to host my own webserver from home but my ISP doesn't provide a static IP unless I switch a business account (at an extra cost, of course). I host many other people's (only friends, so downtime here and there isn't a massive issue) websites, so I have my own nameservers - so it's easy for people to point their websites at my server. It's when using those nameservers I need to associate the nameserver with a fixed IP, hence the issue I'm having.

  • 1
    Why are you trying to create private name servers? What is the advantage that you are seeking? The rules of the road of the Internet is that DNS is a stable and dedicated service. It is not intended to move around. However, there is no reason why you cannot us no-ip on a computer that also be a name server. I do warn you, you do not want to create a NS for your domain with the SOA (statement of authority) record that is dependent upon the domain name resolving. This always fails at some point and almost impossible to fix. – closetnoc Dec 18 '16 at 17:46
  • I may have used private wrongly. I currently host my own webserver on a VPS, which has a static IP. However, I'd like to host my own webserver from home but my ISP doesn't provide a static IP unless I switch a business account (at an extra cost, of course). I host many other people's (only friends, so downtime here and there isn't a massive issue) websites, so I have my own nameservers - so it's easy for people to point their websites at my server. It's when using those nameservers I need to associate the nameserver with a fixed IP, hence the issue I'm having. – Ricky Dec 18 '16 at 21:03
  • And your name servers are on the VPS or at home?? – closetnoc Dec 18 '16 at 22:04
  • They point to the VPS. So, I have ns1.example.com pointing to my VPS's static IP address, and DNS on the VPS for the websites. – Ricky Dec 18 '16 at 22:28
  • 1
    So lets see if I have right... you want to be able to have dynamic DNS using your DNS and a DDNS client on your or others computers. I am sure this can be done. Though honesty, I have not worked with DDNS except to put an HP Jornada onto a DDNS so that the web server would be available carrying it around work or at home. I did this once about ten years or so after Christ was a carpenter. You know, when binary was carved on rocks and wheels were square and not triangular. Yaba daba doooo! (I might have gotten carried away...) – closetnoc Dec 18 '16 at 23:08
1

The way those dynamic DNS services work is that the agent that they install on your network updates the DNS record in near real time every time a new IP address is detected and maintain an extremely low time to live for the DNS records (often as low as just a few seconds) so that the DNS records basically never get cached by upstream DNS services. In order for you to achieve something similar for your system you would have to sign up with a white label DNS provider that supports real time agent record updates (I am not aware of any at the moment) or you would have to create your own agent that can remotely change the DNS records for you (getting rather complicated at this point).

I will point out though that most ISP's have restrictions in place on their networks (and automated detection to enforce the restriction) to prevent people using residential internet services to host websites. This is more often than not based on monitoring the download versus the upload bandwidth, a normal residential service will have mostly download and a very small (comparitively speaking) upload level whereas a connection that is doing some description of hosting will have a much higher than expected upload usage for the month. Given the costs involved in setting up an agent updatable DNS service and the risk of your residential service being cut for breach of terms of service compared to the costs of a small business connection which would support a static IP address and allow hosting you would honestly IMO be better off going for the small business service over the residential service. I don't know who your ISP is personally but the price difference between a residential service and a small business service (here in Australia at any rate) are minimal and you get significantly greater value out of the service on small business than on residential.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.