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The problem I see is that you're "splitting the switch" trying to have a potpourri content site on a business site. Don't do that.

There's nothing wrong with a noncommercial site that has content on a wide variety of subjects. Many people's personal websites are like that, or at the extreme, Geocities or Blogspot. However these sites are not principally business/product/advertising sites.

Obviously there's nothing wrong with having a business site.

Unfortunately, when search engines didn't want the web flooded with machine generated keyword spew, this became "content marketing" and the web became flooded with cheaply written content spew.

So when you have a business site also with a bunch of unrelated articles tacked on for no apparent reason, it looks exactly like the worst form of content marketing.

So my suggestion is to have 2 sites. Let your business site focus on your business, and have a separate site for your multiple-subject potpourri. If you're trying to use this content to doorway people to your business site, don't do that. It doesn't work. Web browsers don't "push" like that, precisely because they are skeptical from so many spammers trying. The best you can hope for is they like your content, and come to like you, and become interested in what else you do.

Similarly if you have two distantly related businesses, have 2a website for each. Magician and electrician? 2 websites.


301 or 302 redirects are for directing users to the exact same content in a different location. They should be maintained permanently to benefit people who reached the old location via bookmarks, links from external sites, etc. Suppose you have a page on making your own soap. If you move it, use 301/302. If you don't want to host that page anymore and are removing it from the web permanently, the correct reply is "410 Gone" -- preferably with an HTML body which explains to the user that the content is gone for good and isn't coming back. Users can't read HTTP codes.

If you want to also put an ad on the 410 page, that's fine, as long as the user must click it to continue. I mean, that makes it a doorway page, but the search engine won't care since 410 tells it not to index.

The problem I see is that you're "splitting the switch" trying to have a potpourri content site on a business site. Don't do that.

There's nothing wrong with a noncommercial site that has content on a wide variety of subjects. Many people's personal websites are like that, or at the extreme, Geocities or Blogspot. However these sites are not principally business/product/advertising sites.

Obviously there's nothing wrong with having a business site.

Unfortunately, when search engines didn't want the web flooded with machine generated keyword spew, this became "content marketing" and the web became flooded with cheaply written content spew.

So when you have a business site also with a bunch of unrelated articles tacked on for no apparent reason, it looks exactly like the worst form of content marketing.

So my suggestion is to have 2 sites. Let your business site focus on your business, and have a separate site for your multiple-subject potpourri. If you're trying to use this content to doorway people to your business site, don't do that. It doesn't work. Web browsers don't "push" like that, precisely because they are skeptical from so many spammers trying. The best you can hope for is they like your content, and come to like you, and become interested in what else you do.

Similarly if you have two distantly related businesses, have 2 websites.

The problem I see is that you're "splitting the switch" trying to have a potpourri content site on a business site. Don't do that.

There's nothing wrong with a noncommercial site that has content on a wide variety of subjects. Many people's personal websites are like that, or at the extreme, Geocities or Blogspot. However these sites are not principally business/product/advertising sites.

Obviously there's nothing wrong with having a business site.

Unfortunately, when search engines didn't want the web flooded with machine generated keyword spew, this became "content marketing" and the web became flooded with cheaply written content spew.

So when you have a business site also with a bunch of unrelated articles tacked on for no apparent reason, it looks exactly like the worst form of content marketing.

So my suggestion is to have 2 sites. Let your business site focus on your business, and have a separate site for your multiple-subject potpourri. If you're trying to use this content to doorway people to your business site, don't do that. It doesn't work. Web browsers don't "push" like that, precisely because they are skeptical from so many spammers trying. The best you can hope for is they like your content, and come to like you, and become interested in what else you do.

Similarly if you have two distantly related businesses, have a website for each. Magician and electrician? 2 websites.


301 or 302 redirects are for directing users to the exact same content in a different location. They should be maintained permanently to benefit people who reached the old location via bookmarks, links from external sites, etc. Suppose you have a page on making your own soap. If you move it, use 301/302. If you don't want to host that page anymore and are removing it from the web permanently, the correct reply is "410 Gone" -- preferably with an HTML body which explains to the user that the content is gone for good and isn't coming back. Users can't read HTTP codes.

If you want to also put an ad on the 410 page, that's fine, as long as the user must click it to continue. I mean, that makes it a doorway page, but the search engine won't care since 410 tells it not to index.

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source | link

The problem I see is that you're "splitting the switch" trying to have a potpourri content site on a business site. Don't do that.

There's nothing wrong with a noncommercial site that has content on a wide variety of subjects. Many people's personal websites are like that, or at the extreme, Geocities or Blogspot. However these sites are not principally business/product/advertising sites.

Obviously there's nothing wrong with having a business site.

Unfortunately, when search engines didn't want the web flooded with machine generated keyword spew, this became "content marketing" and the web became flooded with cheaply written content spew.

So when you have a business site also with a bunch of unrelated articles tacked on for no apparent reason, it looks exactly like the worst form of content marketing.

So my suggestion is to have 2 sites. Let your business site focus on your business, and have a separate site for your multiple-subject potpourri. If you're trying to use this content to doorway people to your business site, don't do that. It doesn't work. Web browsers don't "push" like that, precisely because they are skeptical from so many spammers trying. The best you can hope for is they like your content, and come to like you, and become interested in what else you do.

Similarly if you have two distantly related businesses, have 2 websites.