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Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD.

I detailed the process in this answer:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/69050/my-title-tag-doesnt-appear-to-be-getting-crawled-by-google-properly/69080#69080My title tag doesn't appear to be getting crawled by Google properly

But I will paraphrase it for you.

For a few years now, Google has been experimenting with the SERPs most notably since March 2014. As a part of this, the title tag under certain circumstances may be changed. One factor is the title length. As of this writing, if the title tag length is greater than 512 pixels in length Google may chose to use:

  • What appears to be a brand name which can be the domain name with or without the TLD. (most likely)
  • What it knows to be a brand name. (fairly likely)
  • The first header h1 tag. (very likely)
  • A portion of the content that closely matches the search query. (fairly likely)
  • Information from a publicly available source such as ODP DMOZ (not likely).
  • Information from rich snippets mark-up. (less likely)
  • Text from anchors text. (less likely)

In the case of the OP's scenario, Google has chosen to use the domain name (IGN) as a brand name and return it as the SERP link. Managing the title tag length will solve this issue.

Also, this answer may help too: http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768Title in Google does not match <title> of document

Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD.

I detailed the process in this answer:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/69050/my-title-tag-doesnt-appear-to-be-getting-crawled-by-google-properly/69080#69080

But I will paraphrase it for you.

For a few years now, Google has been experimenting with the SERPs most notably since March 2014. As a part of this, the title tag under certain circumstances may be changed. One factor is the title length. As of this writing, if the title tag length is greater than 512 pixels in length Google may chose to use:

  • What appears to be a brand name which can be the domain name with or without the TLD. (most likely)
  • What it knows to be a brand name. (fairly likely)
  • The first header h1 tag. (very likely)
  • A portion of the content that closely matches the search query. (fairly likely)
  • Information from a publicly available source such as ODP DMOZ (not likely).
  • Information from rich snippets mark-up. (less likely)
  • Text from anchors text. (less likely)

In the case of the OP's scenario, Google has chosen to use the domain name (IGN) as a brand name and return it as the SERP link. Managing the title tag length will solve this issue.

Also, this answer may help too: http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD.

I detailed the process in this answer:

My title tag doesn't appear to be getting crawled by Google properly

But I will paraphrase it for you.

For a few years now, Google has been experimenting with the SERPs most notably since March 2014. As a part of this, the title tag under certain circumstances may be changed. One factor is the title length. As of this writing, if the title tag length is greater than 512 pixels in length Google may chose to use:

  • What appears to be a brand name which can be the domain name with or without the TLD. (most likely)
  • What it knows to be a brand name. (fairly likely)
  • The first header h1 tag. (very likely)
  • A portion of the content that closely matches the search query. (fairly likely)
  • Information from a publicly available source such as ODP DMOZ (not likely).
  • Information from rich snippets mark-up. (less likely)
  • Text from anchors text. (less likely)

In the case of the OP's scenario, Google has chosen to use the domain name (IGN) as a brand name and return it as the SERP link. Managing the title tag length will solve this issue.

Also, this answer may help too: Title in Google does not match <title> of document

2 Added new link.
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Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD.

I detailed the process in this answer:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/69050/my-title-tag-doesnt-appear-to-be-getting-crawled-by-google-properly/69080#69080

But I will paraphrase it for you.

For a few years now, Google has been experimenting with the SERPs most notably since March 2014. As a part of this, the title tag under certain circumstances may be changed. One factor is the title length. As of this writing, if the title tag length is greater than 512 pixels in length Google may chose to use:

  • What appears to be a brand name which can be the domain name with or without the TLD. (most likely)
  • What it knows to be a brand name. (fairly likely)
  • The first header h1 tag. (very likely)
  • A portion of the content that closely matches the search query. (fairly likely)
  • Information from a publicly available source such as ODP DMOZ (not likely).
  • Information from rich snippets mark-up. (less likely)
  • Text from anchors text. (less likely)

In the case of the OP's scenario, Google has chosen to use the domain name (IGN) as a brand name and return it as the SERP link. Managing the title tag length will solve this issue.

Also, this answer may help too: http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD.

I detailed the process in this answer:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/69050/my-title-tag-doesnt-appear-to-be-getting-crawled-by-google-properly/69080#69080

But I will paraphrase it for you.

For a few years now, Google has been experimenting with the SERPs most notably since March 2014. As a part of this, the title tag under certain circumstances may be changed. One factor is the title length. As of this writing, if the title tag length is greater than 512 pixels in length Google may chose to use:

  • What appears to be a brand name which can be the domain name with or without the TLD. (most likely)
  • What it knows to be a brand name. (fairly likely)
  • The first header h1 tag. (very likely)
  • A portion of the content that closely matches the search query. (fairly likely)
  • Information from a publicly available source such as ODP DMOZ (not likely).
  • Information from rich snippets mark-up. (less likely)
  • Text from anchors text. (less likely)

In the case of the OP's scenario, Google has chosen to use the domain name (IGN) as a brand name and return it as the SERP link. Managing the title tag length will solve this issue.

Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD.

I detailed the process in this answer:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/69050/my-title-tag-doesnt-appear-to-be-getting-crawled-by-google-properly/69080#69080

But I will paraphrase it for you.

For a few years now, Google has been experimenting with the SERPs most notably since March 2014. As a part of this, the title tag under certain circumstances may be changed. One factor is the title length. As of this writing, if the title tag length is greater than 512 pixels in length Google may chose to use:

  • What appears to be a brand name which can be the domain name with or without the TLD. (most likely)
  • What it knows to be a brand name. (fairly likely)
  • The first header h1 tag. (very likely)
  • A portion of the content that closely matches the search query. (fairly likely)
  • Information from a publicly available source such as ODP DMOZ (not likely).
  • Information from rich snippets mark-up. (less likely)
  • Text from anchors text. (less likely)

In the case of the OP's scenario, Google has chosen to use the domain name (IGN) as a brand name and return it as the SERP link. Managing the title tag length will solve this issue.

Also, this answer may help too: http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

1
source | link

Actually, the answer above is incorrect. You would need to read the question carefully. In this case, the title tag is too long and Google decided to use what it determines as a brand which is simply the domain name without the TLD.

I detailed the process in this answer:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/69050/my-title-tag-doesnt-appear-to-be-getting-crawled-by-google-properly/69080#69080

But I will paraphrase it for you.

For a few years now, Google has been experimenting with the SERPs most notably since March 2014. As a part of this, the title tag under certain circumstances may be changed. One factor is the title length. As of this writing, if the title tag length is greater than 512 pixels in length Google may chose to use:

  • What appears to be a brand name which can be the domain name with or without the TLD. (most likely)
  • What it knows to be a brand name. (fairly likely)
  • The first header h1 tag. (very likely)
  • A portion of the content that closely matches the search query. (fairly likely)
  • Information from a publicly available source such as ODP DMOZ (not likely).
  • Information from rich snippets mark-up. (less likely)
  • Text from anchors text. (less likely)

In the case of the OP's scenario, Google has chosen to use the domain name (IGN) as a brand name and return it as the SERP link. Managing the title tag length will solve this issue.