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Google has found that CTR(s) increase with site branding and because Google gauges user satisfaction through CTR, Google sees site branding as a positive thing for it's business. As part of the recent SERP redesign, Google made some changes that includes site branding for shorter title links as an effort to add value. I can understand the heartburn this causes! Unfortunately, the only way to control the title link is to tightly control the title length. Here is an answer that details some of this- ignore the post title:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768Title in Google does not match <title> of document

All of this posts points I have experienced and experimented with. I happen to prefer the site branding, however, I originally objected to it. I can understand not wanting site branding and preferring the title to be shown as is. Afterall, you crafted them very carefully for performance. Unfortunately, Google sees fit to make this a moving target. I do not agree that this should happen. Titles should be used as given (in my opinion).

Google has found that CTR(s) increase with site branding and because Google gauges user satisfaction through CTR, Google sees site branding as a positive thing for it's business. As part of the recent SERP redesign, Google made some changes that includes site branding for shorter title links as an effort to add value. I can understand the heartburn this causes! Unfortunately, the only way to control the title link is to tightly control the title length. Here is an answer that details some of this- ignore the post title:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

All of this posts points I have experienced and experimented with. I happen to prefer the site branding, however, I originally objected to it. I can understand not wanting site branding and preferring the title to be shown as is. Afterall, you crafted them very carefully for performance. Unfortunately, Google sees fit to make this a moving target. I do not agree that this should happen. Titles should be used as given (in my opinion).

Google has found that CTR(s) increase with site branding and because Google gauges user satisfaction through CTR, Google sees site branding as a positive thing for it's business. As part of the recent SERP redesign, Google made some changes that includes site branding for shorter title links as an effort to add value. I can understand the heartburn this causes! Unfortunately, the only way to control the title link is to tightly control the title length. Here is an answer that details some of this- ignore the post title:

Title in Google does not match <title> of document

All of this posts points I have experienced and experimented with. I happen to prefer the site branding, however, I originally objected to it. I can understand not wanting site branding and preferring the title to be shown as is. Afterall, you crafted them very carefully for performance. Unfortunately, Google sees fit to make this a moving target. I do not agree that this should happen. Titles should be used as given (in my opinion).

2 Fixed typo.
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Google has found that CTR(s) increase with site branding and because Google gauges user satisfaction through CTR, Google sees site branding as a positive thing for it's business. As part of the recent SERP redesign, Google made some changes that include includingincludes site branding for shorter title links as an effort to add value. I can understand the heartburn this causes! Unfortunately, the only way to control the title link is to tightly control the title length. Here is an answer that details some of this- ignore the post title:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

All of this posts points I have experienced and experimented with. I happen to prefer the site branding, however, I originally objected to it. I can understand not wanting site branding and preferring the title to be shown as is. Afterall, you crafted them very carefully for performance. Unfortunately, Google sees fit to make this a moving target. I do not agree that this should happen. Titles should be used as given (in my opinion).

Google has found that CTR(s) increase with site branding and because Google gauges user satisfaction through CTR, Google sees site branding as a positive thing for it's business. As part of the recent SERP redesign, Google made some changes that include including site branding for shorter title links as an effort to add value. I can understand the heartburn this causes! Unfortunately, the only way to control the title link is to tightly control the title length. Here is an answer that details some of this- ignore the post title:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

All of this posts points I have experienced and experimented with. I happen to prefer the site branding, however, I originally objected to it. I can understand not wanting site branding and preferring the title to be shown as is. Afterall, you crafted them very carefully for performance. Unfortunately, Google sees fit to make this a moving target. I do not agree that this should happen. Titles should be used as given (in my opinion).

Google has found that CTR(s) increase with site branding and because Google gauges user satisfaction through CTR, Google sees site branding as a positive thing for it's business. As part of the recent SERP redesign, Google made some changes that includes site branding for shorter title links as an effort to add value. I can understand the heartburn this causes! Unfortunately, the only way to control the title link is to tightly control the title length. Here is an answer that details some of this- ignore the post title:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

All of this posts points I have experienced and experimented with. I happen to prefer the site branding, however, I originally objected to it. I can understand not wanting site branding and preferring the title to be shown as is. Afterall, you crafted them very carefully for performance. Unfortunately, Google sees fit to make this a moving target. I do not agree that this should happen. Titles should be used as given (in my opinion).

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Google has found that CTR(s) increase with site branding and because Google gauges user satisfaction through CTR, Google sees site branding as a positive thing for it's business. As part of the recent SERP redesign, Google made some changes that include including site branding for shorter title links as an effort to add value. I can understand the heartburn this causes! Unfortunately, the only way to control the title link is to tightly control the title length. Here is an answer that details some of this- ignore the post title:

http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/65767/title-in-google-does-not-match-title-of-document/65768#65768

All of this posts points I have experienced and experimented with. I happen to prefer the site branding, however, I originally objected to it. I can understand not wanting site branding and preferring the title to be shown as is. Afterall, you crafted them very carefully for performance. Unfortunately, Google sees fit to make this a moving target. I do not agree that this should happen. Titles should be used as given (in my opinion).