5 Just correcting a typo. Added ", Inc." just to be able to save the edit. The six character edit limit is going to prevent people from performing simple fixes, like correcting typos.
source | link

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN: $0.18
  • Verisign, Inc. -- the .com registry: $7.85
  • 3% credit card processing fee: $0.30
  • Your registrar: $1.67

High prices charged by registries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The They have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN: $0.18
  • Verisign -- the .com registry: $7.85
  • 3% credit card processing fee: $0.30
  • Your registrar: $1.67

High prices charged by registries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN: $0.18
  • Verisign, Inc. -- the .com registry: $7.85
  • 3% credit card processing fee: $0.30
  • Your registrar: $1.67

High prices charged by registries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. They have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

4 pricing example expanded
source | link

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN --: $0.18
  • Verisign -- the .com registry -- $8: $7.0085
  • 3% credit card processing fee: $0.30
  • Your registrar --: $1.8267

High prices charged by registries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN -- $0.18
  • Verisign -- the .com registry -- $8.00
  • Your registrar -- $1.82

High prices charged by registries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN: $0.18
  • Verisign -- the .com registry: $7.85
  • 3% credit card processing fee: $0.30
  • Your registrar: $1.67

High prices charged by registries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

3 spelling
source | link

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN -- $0.18
  • Verisign -- the .com registry -- $8.00
  • Your registrar -- $1.82

High prices charged by registrarsregistries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN -- $0.18
  • Verisign -- the .com registry -- $8.00
  • Your registrar -- $1.82

High prices charged by registrars are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

ICANN lists a set of qualifications that registrars must be able to perform. Among these are:

  • Capabilities for registration and transfer of domains
  • Requirements for security and scalability
  • Backups
  • 5 employees
  • Carry insurance
  • Have cash in the bank

ICANN maintains a list of hundreds of accredited registars. All these registrars have to compete with each other on price, customer service, and brand recognition. Given the stiff competition, I would say that fees that registrars charge are determined by the market. If a registrar could meet ICANN's requirements and offer domain names for significantly less, then one would do so.

As Matt Nordhoff points out, the registry itself also gets a substantial share of the money you pay for a domain name. For example when you register a $10 .com domain, the fee is split:

  • ICANN -- $0.18
  • Verisign -- the .com registry -- $8.00
  • Your registrar -- $1.82

High prices charged by registries are likely because of lack of competition. There have only been a handful of registries, and of those, the .com registry has been the most popular by far. In the last year ICANN has created many new top level domains run by different companies. The have done so partly in the hope that it will increase competition and drive down prices. It is unclear at this point whether that will work. The costs that new registries must pay to ICANN to apply are very steep. That may prevent any of them from being able to offer low prices on the domain names in their registry.

2 Added new information about registries.
source | link
1
source | link