2 typo
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Core files contain the image of the process'sprocess' memory at the time of its termination (i.e. when it crashed). They can be used to inspect the state of the program when it was terminated.

If you're seeing lots of them and they are recreated fast, I would invest some time in debugging which specific program crashed and why. It's probably not a good thing it crashed so it might be worth to look after them.

If you don't see many of them, it's safe to delete them.

Core Dump on Wikipedia

Core files contain the image of the process's memory at the time of its termination (i.e. when it crashed). They can be used to inspect the state of the program when it was terminated.

If you're seeing lots of them and they are recreated fast, I would invest some time in debugging which specific program crashed and why. It's probably not a good thing it crashed so it might be worth to look after them.

If you don't see many of them, it's safe to delete them.

Core Dump on Wikipedia

Core files contain the image of the process' memory at the time of its termination (i.e. when it crashed). They can be used to inspect the state of the program when it was terminated.

If you're seeing lots of them and they are recreated fast, I would invest some time in debugging which specific program crashed and why. It's probably not a good thing it crashed so it might be worth to look after them.

If you don't see many of them, it's safe to delete them.

Core Dump on Wikipedia

1
source | link

Core files contain the image of the process's memory at the time of its termination (i.e. when it crashed). They can be used to inspect the state of the program when it was terminated.

If you're seeing lots of them and they are recreated fast, I would invest some time in debugging which specific program crashed and why. It's probably not a good thing it crashed so it might be worth to look after them.

If you don't see many of them, it's safe to delete them.

Core Dump on Wikipedia