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I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

There is something NetworkSolutions can do, but I'm not sure it applies to us. (Emphasis added.)

Advanced DNS Records are pre-configured to utilize your Network Solutions® services. [catcall: We have no Network Solutions services besides registration. We currently have our own web server and our own mail server.] Advanced users may wish to modify these records in order to add new hosts to the domain, change IP addresses, or modify where email messages are delivered. This option is helpful if you want to keep one of your Network Solutions services active (e.g., your emailbox) and host your other service (e.g., your website) with another provider.

In order to use Advanced DNS Manager, your Domain Name Servers must be moved to Network Solutions managed Name Servers.

I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

There is something NetworkSolutions can do, but I'm not sure it applies to us. (Emphasis added.)

Advanced DNS Records are pre-configured to utilize your Network Solutions® services. [catcall: We have no Network Solutions services besides registration. We currently have our own web server and our own mail server.] Advanced users may wish to modify these records in order to add new hosts to the domain, change IP addresses, or modify where email messages are delivered. This option is helpful if you want to keep one of your Network Solutions services active (e.g., your emailbox) and host your other service (e.g., your website) with another provider.

In order to use Advanced DNS Manager, your Domain Name Servers must be moved to Network Solutions managed Name Servers.

I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

There is something NetworkSolutions can do, but I'm not sure it applies to us. (Emphasis added.)

Advanced DNS Records are pre-configured to utilize your Network Solutions® services. [catcall: We have no Network Solutions services besides registration. We currently have our own web server and our own mail server.] Advanced users may wish to modify these records in order to add new hosts to the domain, change IP addresses, or modify where email messages are delivered. This option is helpful if you want to keep one of your Network Solutions services active (e.g., your emailbox) and host your other service (e.g., your website) with another provider.

In order to use Advanced DNS Manager, your Domain Name Servers must be moved to Network Solutions managed Name Servers.

4 Note about Network Solutions advanced DNS services, which require moving domain name servers.
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I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

There is something NetworkSolutions can do, but I'm not sure it applies to us. (Emphasis added.)

Advanced DNS Records are pre-configured to utilize your Network Solutions® services. [catcall: We have no Network Solutions services besides registration. We currently have our own web server and our own mail server.] Advanced users may wish to modify these records in order to add new hosts to the domain, change IP addresses, or modify where email messages are delivered. This option is helpful if you want to keep one of your Network Solutions services active (e.g., your emailbox) and host your other service (e.g., your website) with another provider.

In order to use Advanced DNS Manager, your Domain Name Servers must be moved to Network Solutions managed Name Servers.

I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

There is something NetworkSolutions can do, but I'm not sure it applies to us. (Emphasis added.)

Advanced DNS Records are pre-configured to utilize your Network Solutions® services. [catcall: We have no Network Solutions services besides registration. We currently have our own web server and our own mail server.] Advanced users may wish to modify these records in order to add new hosts to the domain, change IP addresses, or modify where email messages are delivered. This option is helpful if you want to keep one of your Network Solutions services active (e.g., your emailbox) and host your other service (e.g., your website) with another provider.

In order to use Advanced DNS Manager, your Domain Name Servers must be moved to Network Solutions managed Name Servers.

3 Expanded question with whois information, and third-party response.
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I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?

I'm In a situation that's slightly different from this question.

We currently host our own web server and mail server. We're moving to a SaaS accounting and practice management service. One option is to also let them host our website and email.

Part of their process requires us to provide them our username and password to our domain registrar.

Here's how our situation is different from the other question.

  • We're already registered for the next 10 years. (We have 9 years left.)
  • Our registrar doesn't provide DNS services. AT&T, our ISP, does.
  • Updating the administrative and technical contacts should be a one-time thing, right?

Given that situation, can anyone imagine any legitimate business reason for them to require the username and password to our registrar account?

Aren't we risking giving away our domain name by turning that information over to them?


Edit: I told them I didn't have any problem letting them change our DNS records, but that our registrar (networksolutions.com) didn't have anything to do with that. AT&T (sbcglobal.net) is our SOA; I have instructions for how to tell AT&T to change our DNS records.

Their response: We will be hosting the new site, so there will be no other way to change your DNS unless we have the domain registrar since we use the domain providers nameservers.

My interpretation: The domain provider's nameservers are what I'd see if I did whois.

$ whois my-domain-name.com
[snip]
Registrar: NETWORK SOLUTIONS, LLC.
Whois Server: whois.networksolutions.com
Referral URL: http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/
Name Server: NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET
Name Server: NS2.SBCGLOBAL.NET

So they need to talk to the people who administer NS1.SBCGLOBAL.NET (AT&T), right? Is there anything NetworkSolutions can do to change those DNS records?

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2 spelling.
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